Wanted: 27 to 30 foot Junk Rigged Sloop near Michigan, USA

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  • 17 Apr 2017 15:07
    Message # 4756545

    Hello,

    If anyone is selling a 30 foot (max) junk rigged boat in North America east of the Mississippi then please let me know!

    I am looking for a boat 30' or just under this length within 120 miles of of Holland, MI. I would prefer to have only a single mast and sail, but if there is a nice JR schooner available right around the corner from me I will certainly consider the opportunity!

    If anyone is aware of any leads please let me know.

    Thank you,

    Scott.


    Last modified: 04 May 2017 15:20 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Apr 2017 17:28
    Reply # 4756771 on 4756545

    Scott, are you willing to think about doing a conversion, or do you know you want to find one ready to go?  I have found a Bristol and a Bayfield that I think might warrant consideration, and I am looking for others with similar characteristics to those 2. 

    Regardless I am on the hunt as well and will subscribe to this post.

    Best,

    Bob

  • 17 Apr 2017 21:03
    Reply # 4757276 on 4756545

    Hi Bob,

    (Edit: Oops. Sorry that you missed out on the Eastward Ho).

    I would like to find something that is already properly converted or that was originally designed for a junk rig. I fully expect that this will never happen, but I thought I should post and see what happens.

    Getting a low price on a boat with a perfect condition interior and a missing or broken rig would make me feel a lot more comfortable with buying a boat just to convert her over to a junk rig.

    Please -- send links to any boats up this way that are for sale and are in your opinion a good choice to convert.

    Scott.


    Last modified: 17 Apr 2017 21:54 | Anonymous member
  • 30 Apr 2017 16:33
    Reply # 4792525 on 4756545

    Makes me think there should be some kind of North American junk rig lonely hearts club.  These things are so rare in this neck of the woods.  Do a search and almost everything is in the UK, NZ or AU.  Good luck with your search.

  • 01 May 2017 01:28
    Reply # 4792972 on 4756545

    James,

    I have been wondering for some time why the boat designs i like are only in the UK and other far away places. On my first boat search I got really into bilge keel designs only to find out there are almost none in north america. The westerly boats seem to have great accommodations and features for their size. And no storage cradle needed.

    This time I have learned the same about junk rigs. Is anyone will to speculate about why this is?


    Scott.


    Last modified: 01 May 2017 01:30 | Anonymous member
  • 02 May 2017 13:06
    Reply # 4796345 on 4756545

    James,

    I am surprised I never thought I would see a twin bilge keel boat in the U.S., but here is one for sale down in the Florida Keys.


  • 02 May 2017 18:56
    Reply # 4809109 on 4756545

      Invitation to speculate?  I hate to hijack the thread.  I think the bilge keel one is easier than the junk sail.  Bilge keel boats have enormous practicality around the UK because of the size of the tides people have to contend with.  People have their boats regularly - every day - 'dry out'.  That doesn't seem to happen in many places in NA certainly not enough to effect production design.  I think there is also a structural cost to providing that kind of "hold up the boat with angled supports" built right into the hull.

      Even more guessing going on here.  The junk rig motivation is I think 70% aesthetics  and 30% misplaced perceived need for pointing ability.  A Bermudian rig just looks simpler and more advanced.  People in the US and Canada are largely sailing in protected waterways for enjoyment and don't have a deep connection to the sea.  In the UK there aren't large protected areas of ocean/lake and the ocean is everywhere.  I think that forces a more practical mindful approach to sea going equipment.  Anything that keeps an ocean going sailor from going forward in rough weather is incredibly valuable.  

    Last modified: 02 May 2017 18:58 | Anonymous member
  • 03 May 2017 11:36
    Reply # 4811954 on 4756545

    Hi Scott,

    Within 120 miles could be a challenge – that's pretty close, in the USA, for any specific boat desires! There is a junk rigged cruising boat for sale In Québec at the moment, still available so far as I know. Do you do Facebook? There does not seem to be a regular listing for this boat, but there is this Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009372818223 The boat name is
    Zong la Jonque, which has apparently undergone a lot of restoration by this owner – maybe others here will be familiar with this boat?

    This fellow has also been in touch in the Facebook group International Junk Rig: Sailing Old and New, so there's a small conversation there, where one could also get some more information.

    Cheers,

    Shemaya

  • 03 May 2017 11:55
    Reply # 4811959 on 4809109
    James Pike wrote:

      Invitation to speculate?  I hate to hijack the thread.  I think the bilge keel one is easier than the junk sail.  Bilge keel boats have enormous practicality around the UK because of the size of the tides people have to contend with.  People have their boats regularly - every day - 'dry out'.  That doesn't seem to happen in many places in NA certainly not enough to effect production design.  I think there is also a structural cost to providing that kind of "hold up the boat with angled supports" built right into the hull.

      Even more guessing going on here.  The junk rig motivation is I think 70% aesthetics  and 30% misplaced perceived need for pointing ability.  A Bermudian rig just looks simpler and more advanced.  People in the US and Canada are largely sailing in protected waterways for enjoyment and don't have a deep connection to the sea.  In the UK there aren't large protected areas of ocean/lake and the ocean is everywhere.  I think that forces a more practical mindful approach to sea going equipment.  Anything that keeps an ocean going sailor from going forward in rough weather is incredibly valuable.  

    Hi James,

    Those of us in New England keep hoping to see more bilge keel boats available here – from Cape Cod and north, our tides range from 10 to 18 feet, with the highest ones as you go further along the Maine coast toward Canada. it's a puzzle why bilge keels have not caught on more.

    As for junk rig sailors in the USA, there are more of us than you would think! We are in the process of organizing a junket for this September, in Maine, and have had good responses by e-mail. I would take issue, on the subject of "deep connection to the sea!" There are long traditions on all the US coasts, including working sail, from before engines took over. But it's very true that you have to travel a VERY long way between coasts! I have envied the UK, for the coast being so nearby everywhere, and the way that influences how the inhabitants relate to the sea. In the US and Canada, it's a more select group, those of us who are near enough to feel it with so much connection.

  • 04 May 2017 15:18
    Reply # 4814297 on 4756545

    Hello Shemaya,

    Thank you for the link to 'Zong La Jonque'. I now find myself in a difficult spot. I promised myself that I would never use facebook and it does not let me sign up with the fake name I tried. I am not interested in facebook gossip or whatnot but I would like to see what is going on with junk rigs in Quebec. Not an easy decision.

    I think the 120 mile limit is to small. If anyone is selling a 30 foot (max) junk rigged boat in North America east of the Mississippi then please let me know!

    Scott.

    Last modified: 04 May 2017 15:20 | Anonymous member
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