25 foot Wilf O'Kell

  • 03 Nov 2017 19:04
    Message # 5519087

    $16K NZD

    I have no affiliation to the owner, I just happened to spot this in the boating section of NZ's version of ebay this morning (TradeMe).

    Appears to be a well constructed ferro build, with a lovely wood finished interior. 5'9" headroom, fine for us shorties.

    Prime for a conversion to JR by a Kiwi looking for a boat in this size range.

    Advert says it was built in Tasmania and sailed to NZ in 1980.

    If I didn't already own a Contessa 26 I'd be looking at this seriously myself!

    https://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/auction-1457156706.htm

    Last modified: 03 Nov 2017 19:05 | Anonymous member
  • 04 Nov 2017 21:36
    Reply # 5536230 on 5519087
    Boy, what a sweet, little boat.  Obviously been loved and cherished all these years.
  • 04 Nov 2017 22:13
    Reply # 5536686 on 5519087

    Yes it is a sweet little boat, beautifully built.  Wilf O' Kell was a respected designer and builder of strong ferro boats in the 70s in QLD. My only reservation is that I would not want to put a mast through that lovely double bunk up fwd.  It is a major issue with small boat conversions - I paid the price on Arion but I miss my huge double bunk.  It is just not the same having to share the bunk with the mast, certainly not a cold alloy one.  Maybe varnished timber would be more acceptable but things would still go bump in the night!  Your shins or forehead, depending on which way you slept.

  • 05 Nov 2017 10:10
    Reply # 5544090 on 5519087
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
     

    Yes, that boat looks good, with a cosy interior.

    As for mast through the bunk up forward; I can understand that it is annoying for live-aboards like Annie and Graham. I, on the other hand, am not so concerned about it. I cruised quite a lot in my first junk, Malena, and the thick wooden mast next to me never robbed any sleep.

    The aluminium mast of my present Ingeborg is slimmer than any wooden mast would have been, but is on the other hand very cold: It transports chill from outside to inside. Therefore, this spring I wrapped it in bubble plastic and stitched a cover from some pvc cloth over that again. This has been a success. It feels nice, soft and warm to touch, and doesn’t get covered in condense, which eventually would have wetted out the mattresses.

    This mast position also relies heavily on a perfectly watertight mast coat. My wrap-around and taped version (based on the PJR p.143 mast coat), has proven to hold water, literally.

    Conclusion: If fitting a mast through the foredeck, where there are bunks, were a show-stopper, then a lot of small boats would have to be ruled out from conversion to JR. Better adapt to the not-perfect world than reject them, me thinks.

    Arne

     

       

    Last modified: 06 Nov 2017 14:43 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 05 Nov 2017 19:37
    Reply # 5549867 on 5519087

    In truth, it wouldn't be an issue because it's a FAKE double bunk.  Sad. 

    There is a fold-down flap on the starboard side, if you look carefully atthe photos.  It is, in fact, over the toilet, which could be a tad annoying at three in the morning.  So I suspect that there's quite a large, comfortable single along the port side.

    And, of course, if you didn't want the mast next to the bunk you could always either put it at a strong rake like Fantail's or go for a split junk rig or the type that Pete and Linda fitted to Francis H.  There are so many of these nice little boats about just waiting for conversion - if you don't have a hankering for shoal draught.

  • 05 Nov 2017 23:10
    Reply # 5552245 on 5519087

    Annie, you have cleared up a puzzle for me about that double bunk.  I couldn't reconcile the images of the bunk and the toilet.  They are in the same place!  I guess you'd need to use the bucket at night if the double bunk was in use.  I do love a double bunk.  I am quite capable of expanding at night to occupy the entire space (or so it seems), and always feel really cramped initially when I have to share it, finding it difficult to sleep.  Then I get used to the presence of another animal in my bed and when they leave I have difficulty sleeping again because the bunk seems so empty.  But soon I am back to my old ways, sprawled all over it.  I have got used to having a cold alloy mast in Arion's bunk, and like Arne, have insulated it to make accidental contact less harrowing on cold nights.  If I did it again on Arion, I might consider a schooner rig, as the masts would then come through just forward and aft of the bunk.  I considered Arion too small for a junk schooner rig but have since seen one that looks good. 

    http://www.junkrigassociation.org/resources/MemberAlbums/3295421/Interesting%20junks/Tom%20thumb%20junk%20schooner.jpg

  • 06 Nov 2017 08:38
    Reply # 5557284 on 5519087
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Yes - I believe that's Tigidou - she was BOTM in September 2011.

    Chris

    Last modified: 06 Nov 2017 08:38 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 06 Nov 2017 09:16
    Reply # 5557617 on 5519087
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    One can find more about Bruno Caroit (not Cariot) and his Tiguidou (not Tigidou) on the Yahoo JR group. Just search on brunocaroit under Converstions  -  or try this link.

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/junkrig/
    conversations/messages/20616

    Bruno actually sent me a well-edited DVD, showing the boat sailing. She appears to sail well. As can be seen, Bruno has built camber into both sails.

    Arne

    PS: It would not surprise me if the CE of Tiguidou's schooner rig sits a bit too far aft. I notice that the mainsail is reefed on Graham's photo. Maybe Tiguidou is candidate for a La Chica type rudder?

    Last modified: 06 Nov 2017 18:48 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 07 Nov 2017 07:52
    Reply # 5571862 on 5557617
    Arne Kverneland wrote:

    One can find more about Bruno Caroit (not Cariot) and his Tiguidou (not Tigidou) on the Yahoo JR group. Just search on brunocaroit under Converstions  -  or try this link.

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/junkrig/
    conversations/messages/20616

    Bruno actually sent me a well-edited DVD, showing the boat sailing. She appears to sail well. As can be seen, Bruno has built camber into both sails.

    Arne

    PS: It would not surprise me if the CE of Tiguidou's schooner rig sits a bit too far aft. I notice that the mainsail is reefed on Graham's photo. Maybe Tiguidou is candidate for a La Chica type rudder?


    Ah yes, the vexed question of balance.  My sistership, Minke, has more weatherhelm than the bermudian-rigged Arion had, so I raked my mast forward by three degrees and have been happy with Arion's balance under junk rig.  The Tom Thumb design does have a very large rudder, with the largest area at the bottom, and I am not sure if it could be improved, but I'm no expert.  I am also not sure if it is possible to get the CE of the schooner rig further forward on such a short, heavy boat.  Everything is a compromise!  I have learned to live with my mast position but if I sell Arion, as I am considering, and buy a fibreglass boat for my "retirement" years, I may face the question all over again.  Most small production boats here put a large double bunk forward and have cramped quarterberths aft, often with a dinette in the middle.  I am not keen on another major boat project.  My idea of fun these days is to potter around in the morning and snooze in the afternoon! (I have probably just completed my last long coastal passage.)

    PS:  Interesting that Tiguidou has cambered sails.  I did not pick that up in the photo but can see it now upon closer examination.  That is another question I am going to have to reconsider in my new life of daysailing around sheltered waters on fine, sunny days, when the breezes will invariably be light.


       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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