Good sailcloth for JR

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  • 12 Mar 2017 21:07
    Reply # 4662290 on 4662255
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    David Tyler wrote:
    David Tyler

    [edit] Wikipedia begs to differ, and makes mention of King Henry I and the measure of his arm. Whatever, our American cousins are still using a very archaic measure.

    .. er, which the British , sorry, Imperial standards are not, of course  -  stones, gallons, cwt, SWG, etc. etc...

    A.


    Last modified: 12 Mar 2017 23:33 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 12 Mar 2017 20:26
    Reply # 4662255 on 4398340
    David Tyler wrote:

    ... looking at Wikipedia, I see that it should be 28.5 inches x 36 inches as the unit of USA sailcloth measure...

    Hah!!!

    I've just been referring to my copy of "Sails", by Jeremy Howard-Williams, one of the standard texts on sailmaking. 

    And I've just noticed that he mentions the standard from which the width of USA sailcloth is derived.

    ... wait for it ...

    It was King Henry VIII who first established a standard for the width of broadcloth - by measuring the distance between his nose and his outstretched hand. No, he didn't have very long arms, so that distance was 28.5 inches. I had better make no further comment.

    [edit] Wikipedia begs to differ, and makes mention of King Henry I and the measure of his arm. Whatever, our American cousins are still using a very archaic measure.

    Last modified: 12 Mar 2017 20:46 | David
  • 01 Mar 2017 21:01
    Reply # 4641926 on 4641061
    David Tyler wrote:There may still be some natural colour Clipper Canvas and other material worth considering. Phone Nicola on 01305 457500 or 07799 221119 to check on what's available.


    From personal experience, natural-coloured Clipper Canvas has nowhere near the UV resistance of the tan version.  Unless you intend religiously to cover the sail, it's probably not worth considering.
  • 01 Mar 2017 13:03
    Reply # 4641061 on 1206989
    David Tyler wrote:

    That does sound expensive for Weathermax, but they are the only source. Clipper Canvas from Kayospruce is also too expensive, but I bought my material from an eBay store Englishseadog. I've drawn a blank on the red lightweight material that I intended to make David Hall's sail from, so I'll be phoning them on Monday to see what they have. Their eBay listings often don't accurately reflect their actual stock.

    I've ordered enough cream coloured 4 oz sailcloth for the sail for David Hall's Nimrod, and also the remains of their stock of tan coloured 4 oz sailcloth, for when I next get a rush of blood to the head and decide to make another sail. This is Hayward's Sunwing, absolutely the last ends-of-rolls. It was the best of the conventional cruising sailcloths, but it's all gone at this weight. There may still be some natural colour Clipper Canvas and other material worth considering. Phone Nicola on 01305 457500 or 07799 221119 to check on what's available.


  • 20 Feb 2017 09:13
    Reply # 4618710 on 1206989

    I placed an order for the 92g polyester, but I won't hold you responsible, David :)

    The price is so much less than Outguard, and this is my first JR sail, after all. I'll use tough seatbelt webbing, let's hope this works ok.


    EDIT: I will also consider the possibility of using Roger Taylor hinge-system between the top three panels and the rest of the sail. This will make it possible to make the upper part of the sail from a thicker cloth later on, if needed.

    Last modified: 20 Feb 2017 11:04 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Feb 2017 16:33
    Reply # 4617820 on 1206989

    That's as much about good sailmaking practice, and stopping flutter and flap, as it is about the weight of the material. Reinforcement, doubling where necessary and correct alignment will improve the performance of any fabric. Personally, I would choose the Outguard 190 for a serious offshore sail, the 92gm for an inshore sail. But don't take my word for it. Get a sample of at least a metre of each, and make sure by actually making something. Stuff sacks are always useful.

    Last modified: 19 Feb 2017 16:48 | David
  • 19 Feb 2017 14:58
    Reply # 4617732 on 1206989
    Yes,

    you have convinced me, too. Now I'm down to two options: this 92g polyester you recommend, or the Outguard 190.

    But which one... That seems a harder choice than I thought.

    Would you trust the 92g in F7-8 winds?

    Last modified: 19 Feb 2017 15:00 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Feb 2017 14:27
    Reply # 4617688 on 4598595
    David Tyler wrote:

    I've got some 92 gm/sq m/2.7 oz sq yd textured ripstop polyester from Pennine Outdoor, which I intend to use for the cover of my new wind vane.

    This morning, I sewed up my vane cover, and this confirmed my thoughts about the ripstop polyester being suitable for making a small sail. It's smooth and shiny, yet not too slippery to handle. It feels strong, but like other fabrics that we've been discussing, it stretches more across its width, so cloths should be laid parallel to the leech. It feels very dense, and resists the needle going through; this shows that it is quite tightly woven.
  • 19 Feb 2017 10:34
    Reply # 4617472 on 1206989

    If I were at all interested in lightweight junk rig racing sails (which I'm not), I'd be investigating Code Zero fabrics like this and this.

  • 18 Feb 2017 14:48
    Reply # 4616398 on 1206989

    One more thought: what about using a stiff, around 200g cloth (weathermax or outguard) and sewing the sail using Roger Taylor's hinge system? The sail is said to settle better in light winds with the hinges, right?

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