The "Sib-Lim" Challenge

  • 19 Feb 2015 17:41
    Reply # 3229898 on 3229601
    Jonathan Snodgrass wrote:
    David Tyler wrote:

    Is it time to start a new topic for this, as it's no longer Annie's Sib-Lim?

    Indeed!

    Annie Hill as client, with designers (David Tyler and others) and with Alan Boswell in the background ready to act as Moderator seem to have established a prototype of a 'process'. Congratulations! This may in due course lead to a firm design of a boat to meet Annie's particular statements of requirement and this in due course may lead to a boat.     

    Maybe you (whoever that may be!) could or should identify a next 'client'.  Step forward any volunteers! 

    Step forward, then, Jonathan! What can we design for you, as client? An OSTAR 40?
  • 19 Feb 2015 11:41
    Reply # 3229601 on 3229068
    David Tyler wrote:

    Is it time to start a new topic for this, as it's no longer Annie's Sib-Lim?


    Indeed!

    Annie Hill as client, with designers (David Tyler and others) and with Alan Boswell in the background ready to act as Moderator seem to have established a prototype of a 'process'. Congratulations! This may in due course lead to a firm design of a boat to meet Annie's particular statements of requirement and this in due course may lead to a boat.     

    Maybe you (whoever that may be!) could or should identify a next 'client'.  Step forward any volunteers! 

    It could perhaps be better if this was significantly different from Annie's statements of requirement, rather than being a relatively minor variation on it. 

    The variations or 'models' of the 'Annie Hill 26' might include: suitable for the bigger person eg the 95 percentile height; the coastal weekender; the ocean capable.  They might even include different hull and deck materials, even a steel hull, cf Tom Thumb.

    But the next "Challenge" might be better to be significantly different eg:  the 'Fiord Racer' 32?; the 'Family Ocean' 36?; the 'Trail-able' 21?; etc, etc. 

    I would suggest however that the key element is someone who really feels a 'need' for a particular boat and would be willing as a client to put in the work to drive it through up to and including building a boat.  (... it is not the beginning, but the continuing of the same, until it be thoroughly finished, which yields the true glory; Francis Drake)

    Last modified: 19 Feb 2015 15:15 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Feb 2015 03:58
    Reply # 3229454 on 3229165
    Hampus Mattsson wrote:

    I uploaded a profile view of my suggestion in "Illustrations". The interior layout will follow within a few days. There is some text describing things on the drawing.

    Drawing here

    Good to see another variation on the theme.

    Coming alongside might be a bit fraught, with the boards so exposed, and they really need to be canted inboard at the top, so that they dig deeper, the more you heel.

    You're right, she'll need more ballast. My understanding is that shoal draft boats like this need to be rather heavy, to give them some grip on the water - both for stability and so as not to blow around when manoeuvring in tight places.

    But we agree on the virtues of stitching pre-shaped panels together. 

    I like the profile view - very reminiscent of an earlier, smaller design, the name of which escapes me. Stone Horse, was it?

  • 19 Feb 2015 00:44
    Reply # 3229174 on 3229068
    David Tyler wrote:

    Too many Davids around here!

    David Thatcher,

    It's becoming clear that the boat you want is somewhat different from the boat that Annie wants. Much lighter, faster, wider stern, more headroom ... I don't think I can adapt my current design; I'd have to start afresh.

    Is it time to start a new topic for this, as it's no longer Annie's Sib-Lim?

    I think I know which David I am, but sometimes I get confused!

    It will be interesting to see Annie's design challenge progress and would be even better to maybe see a boat built in the future. I think David Tylers design has great potential, as does David Webbs. Maybe David T's design is more suited to more challenging coastal sailing whereas David W's would I think suit maybe more gentle conditions, but maybe not. I imagine both designs would get around the world if needed. David W's would be a little more difficult to build because of the radius chine, but hey, if you can build a boat you should be able to manage a bit of radius chine

    I agree that we do have different needs and that will always be the challenge for boat designers. If you ever get a chance to doodle around with the 'sports' version of Annie's boat David T it would be interesting to see what you come up with. I am going to try over the next few days to  get my sketch out my own ideas and see what it looks like.

    Last modified: 19 Feb 2015 04:16 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Feb 2015 00:31
    Reply # 3229165 on 3144241

    I uploaded a profile view of my suggestion in "Illustrations". The interior layout will follow within a few days. There is some text describing things on the drawing.

    Drawing here

  • 18 Feb 2015 22:06
    Reply # 3229068 on 3144241

    Too many Davids around here!

    David Thatcher,

    It's becoming clear that the boat you want is somewhat different from the boat that Annie wants. Much lighter, faster, wider stern, more headroom ... I don't think I can adapt my current design; I'd have to start afresh.

    Is it time to start a new topic for this, as it's no longer Annie's Sib-Lim?

  • 18 Feb 2015 19:31
    Reply # 3228945 on 3144241

    David Tyler, thanks for the reference for Freeship manuals and tutorials, hopefully it will all start to make sense soon!!

    David Thatcher, I will need to get the plans for my 18 foot design scanned,I will then post them for your information. I intend to design a larger version of about 26 feet in length but within the 2.5 meter trailerable beam. If you are interested after looking at the 18 foot design, I will move it up on the schedule of things to do!

    Last modified: 18 Feb 2015 19:32 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Feb 2015 02:16
    Reply # 3228414 on 3228089
    David Webb wrote:

     

    David Thatcher, if you look at my Rodark design you will see that she uses water ballast. This would give you the ability to use only as much ballast as you need/want at any one time, tanks empty for light winds and full for heavier winds.

    I have been thinking about water ballast. Over the years there have been a number of New Zealand designed trailer yachts which have utilized water ballast so as to reduce the weight of the vessel when being towed on a trailer. One problem with water ballast is that it can take up interior space which could otherwise be utilized for storage. Interested in looking at your other design so as to leave 'no stone unturned'.
    Last modified: 18 Feb 2015 03:52 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Feb 2015 20:38
    Reply # 3228167 on 3228089
    David Webb wrote:

    Hi David Tyler,

     Do you know of a tutorial for Freeship online that I can download, so that I can learn to use the program? 

    You can find manuals and tutorials at http://sourceforge.net/projects/freeship/files/
  • 17 Feb 2015 19:24
    Reply # 3228089 on 3144241

    Hi David Tyler,

    thanks for the reply regarding my design. Yes some of the accommodation may move inboard a small amount when I draw her up to scale, but this was only a small amount on Rodark, the similar design I posted in my space in the members area, which I intend to start building shortly for my own use.

    As you suspected the radiused chines are proposed as double diagonal strips 9 X 50 mm, set at a shallow angle (approximately 25 degrees to the horizontal) over close spaced stringers. This should allow the strips to be be edge set into shape with only every fifth or sixth one having to be shaped in any way to create the compound curve, this also allows the strips to overlap the layers of plywood providing a strong joint in that direction as well. I used this method on the deckhouse roof of Arcadian and it was very simple and quick to do. I should have my drawing board available in another four weeks or so, so will start drawing her up to scale then before we leave for Australia for the winter months.

    How did the work go on the rig modifications on Tystie? Do you know of a tutorial for Freeship online that I can download, so that I can learn to use the program? 

    David Thatcher, if you look at my Rodark design you will see that she uses water ballast. This would give you the ability to use only as much ballast as you need/want at any one time, tanks empty for light winds and full for heavier winds. The double floor system keeps the water ballast down low and it does not intrude on the accommodation. You would need to install valves between the chambers if you wanted an intermediate ballast configuration. You could also use water ballast in a slightly deeper and wider box keel than shown for Puffin, or you could use a combination of water ballast and a ballasted drop keel. Lots of permutations and combinations available to meet your desires. I am not sure that Puffin is the design for you as she is designed as a live aboard, you seem to want much more of a day sailer with more emphasis on the speed element. I have a design in mind that may meet your needs, it is an enlargement of my 18 foot design published in Danny Green's book Cruising Sailboat   Kinetics, I can post a copy if you are interested.

    Last modified: 17 Feb 2015 19:59 | Anonymous member
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