SibLim update

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  • 19 Sep 2017 08:43
    Reply # 5268081 on 5266533
    Scott Dufour wrote:

    Annie,

    Your work is so clean and well thought that out it's a combination of inspirational, and, I have to say it, intimidating.  Often times over the last year as I'm making a mess of something on Moon River, I have to keep reminding myself, "It doesn't need to look as good as Annie's." 


    This, of course, assumes that Compulsive Obsessive Disorder is a virtue.  Personally, I wish I could move along a little faster and not get bogged down by detail, but I'm a bit lumbered with what and who I am.  There's nothing like a bit of polished brass and varnish to give a spurious air of quality! And, I don't take photographs of my disasters.  You just get on the way you are and get that boat in the water.  I reckon you're doing a fine, workmanlike job which will produce a strong boat that you can have confidence in and be proud of. 

    I hear you attended 'Shemaya's junket'.  The first of many I hope :-D


    Last modified: 19 Sep 2017 08:44 | Annie
  • 18 Sep 2017 18:49
    Reply # 5266533 on 4315719

    Annie,

    Your work is so clean and well thought that out it's a combination of inspirational, and, I have to say it, intimidating.  Often times over the last year as I'm making a mess of something on Moon River, I have to keep reminding myself, "It doesn't need to look as good as Annie's." 

  • 18 Sep 2017 09:16
    Reply # 5265693 on 5264435
    David Tyler wrote:

    This is looking absolutely superb in the photos, Annie. No way will I accept your self-denigration as a boatbuilder. 

    The use of a multitool to cut off the plugs is a new one on me. Well done for nutting that one out!

    Thank you for that, David.  I'm doing my best to build a boat that is a credit to the designer!  The multitool is amazing: my best efforts with a chisel always resulted in the odd plug chipping below surface and everything else took ages.  I'm a complete fan of the multitool now, for sawing anything that needs to be flush.  I was very cautious at first, because the blades seem quite flexible; however, it's very rarely that they dig in.  Clever machines altogether.
  • 17 Sep 2017 09:59
    Reply # 5264435 on 4315719

    This is looking absolutely superb in the photos, Annie. No way will I accept your self-denigration as a boatbuilder. 

    The use of a multitool to cut off the plugs is a new one on me. Well done for nutting that one out!

  • 17 Sep 2017 03:49
    Reply # 5264233 on 4315719

    I am pleased to say that the heads compartment is finally completed.  Only the forecabin, saloon and galley to go in the interior, and then there's just the cockpit to knock out, the deck to put on, the rudders, bilge boards, mast and sail to make and we'll just about be there.  No doubt I've forgotten one or two other things.

    At least I never thought I was going to 'knock over' this project in a short time!

    You can read all about it on my blog, should you wish to.

  • 03 Sep 2017 02:56
    Reply # 5060911 on 4315719
    Still fitting out the heads compartment, but, like British Rail, we're getting there!

    I've blogged about my latest work, again.
  • 23 Aug 2017 22:45
    Reply # 5044541 on 5043140
    David Tyler wrote:

    Household paints are quite good enough for the interior. Tystie's cabin was painted with Dulux Satinwood, two coats applied by 4" gloss roller over a hi-build epoxy primer that had been sanded smooth. A very smooth finish resulted, that lasted the 16 years that I owned her, without recoating or touch up. It did get sooty in the galley, because of the Taylors kero cooker, but I could see that if I started to repaint there, the rest would then look shabby - so I left it. It's no fun repainting when you're living aboard. I did use two part polyurethane gloss in the heads and the companionway, the wetter and higher wear areas.

    Well, you do tend to get used to what you are living with.  But I think after 10 years it would need repainting.  I don't think I'll fancy doing that, in my mid 70s - especially overhead.  And I recall that the polyurethane paint in Tystie certainly still looks pretty good.
  • 23 Aug 2017 22:42
    Reply # 5044538 on 5043331
    Zane Krajancic wrote:Heh heh all good Annie, I was gently self effacing myself - I'm going to be giving the interior another repaint as there are marks, scratches, goops and glue spills and what not everywhere after a six month refit with another few months to go. I'm sure I'll do a better job next time round. 
    Practice makes perfect, Zane.  By the time you've sanded and repeated 10 times, we probably won't be able to see your roller marks, either!



  • 23 Aug 2017 12:08
    Reply # 5043331 on 5043134
    Annie Hill wrote:
    Zane Krajancic wrote:I used water based something or rather in the interior of my Contessa, with a mold inhibitor pre-added.  So far no mold, but brush strokes and roller marks everywhere.
    It's not the result - it's the fact that we're trying and generally succeeding that is the most important thing, Zane.

    Heh heh all good Annie, I was gently self effacing myself - I'm going to be giving the interior another repaint as there are marks, scratches, goops and glue spills and what not everywhere after a six month refit with another few months to go. I'm sure I'll do a better job next time round. 

  • 23 Aug 2017 09:06
    Reply # 5043140 on 4315719

    Household paints are quite good enough for the interior. Tystie's cabin was painted with Dulux Satinwood, two coats applied by 4" gloss roller over a hi-build epoxy primer that had been sanded smooth. A very smooth finish resulted, that lasted the 16 years that I owned her, without recoating or touch up. It did get sooty in the galley, because of the Taylors kero cooker, but I could see that if I started to repaint there, the rest would then look shabby - so I left it. It's no fun repainting when you're living aboard. I did use two part polyurethane gloss in the heads and the companionway, the wetter and higher wear areas.

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