SibLim update

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 19 Aug 2018 21:00
    Reply # 6582959 on 6582258
    Anonymous wrote:

    Just a question from an ignorant:

    Can you have the boat un-registered, and in case of yes, what waters can one use it in?

    Arne


    Yes, if you don't want to sail to another country then you can leave boat unregistered.  Actually, if you only want to sail in NZ then you don't need any boat papers what so-ever, save a minimum of 3rd party insurance if you want to stay at marinas'.

    Its only when you want to sail to another country that the red tape kicks in.

    You never know Arne, I may be putting my Contessa on a freighter and start my future voyage from Europe in the years ahead, if this Cat 1 stuff proves all too much.  It  actually would be the 'Classic' passage for a small yacht that doesn't go around Cape Horn, i.e Europe, West Indies, Panama, South Pacific, NZ - and actually has a lot of appeal to me.  You never know.  I'd certainly like to see how she sails against Ingeborg being a close sister ship.

    For now though (when I finally launch!), I will be pottering around NZ waters, zooming past Siblim, Sweet Thursday, and Le Cardin Bleu in the Tall Ships regattas and junkettes...!!?? ...well that might be a stretch as they are all superior sailors to moi who is still very green at all this.

    Last modified: 19 Aug 2018 21:13 | Anonymous member
  • 19 Aug 2018 10:28
    Reply # 6582258 on 4315719
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Just a question from an ignorant:

    Can you have the boat un-registered, and in case of yes, what waters can one use it in?

    Arne

  • 18 Aug 2018 05:45
    Reply # 6580791 on 4315719

    Hi,

    the origin of the New Zealand CAT 1 regulations was the rescue of a series of grossly under prepared and under equipped  boats, and was the government's response to that by  a heavy handed and bureaucratic piece of legislation.  When I got Arcadian ready for her CAT 1 inspection I had to deal with this. I found that most of the people enforcing the regulations were quite reasonable at that time. The trouble is that Politicians will not let things alone and continually add things to make this kind of legislation more and more onerous and expensive, and the people who enforce the legislation become more and more full of their own importance so that it becomes progressively more difficult to satisfy their interpretation of the regulations. 

    I can see the sense of having some kind of filter to stop the grossly unprepared from setting out on an ocean voyage, but also respect the opinion of those very experienced sailors who are forced to go through the process against their will.

    All I can say to people like Annie is that the regulations are there and have to be complied with in one way or another, so read the regulations and comply with them, and unless they have changed the rules recently, no you do not need a life raft, you can comply with the regulations with a properly equipped dinghy. Possibly a new commission for John Wellsford?

    David.

     

  • 18 Aug 2018 03:24
    Reply # 6580663 on 6580509
    David Thatcher wrote:
    Annie Hill wrote:

    So, if we are out there in the ocean and our boats are going down in the same set of extreme circumstances, and as I drift pass your sinking boat in my life raft I will very happily offer you a ride. But here's the deal - because I am providing all the boring things like raft, EPIRB, flares and all of that kind of stuff, you need to bring the fun things like beer and nibbles. And I think that even in the life raft I would like to live in a bit of style which would include my glass of Merlot at sun-downer time.

    It's a deal.  And because I won't have all the boring things like raft, EPIRB, flares and all of that kind of stuff, I'll have plenty of room for the fun things like beer and nibbles. And I will not only bring the Merlot (and glasses), I'll bring the landfall bubbly, too.  It would be a shame to waste it!
  • 18 Aug 2018 01:53
    Reply # 6580509 on 6580496
    Annie Hill wrote:

    That's fine, David.  If that's how you choose to go offshore, no-one is stopping you.  My objection is that they are trying to stop me (and Zane and other people) from going offshore in the way that we choose.

    I would hope that any friends of mine would wait for my extreme ETA plus 50% before starting seriously to fret.  And then just put the word around 'has anyone seen Annie?' and not call out the cavalry.  Besides, I don't want to be rescued and feel an enormous unpaid debt to society for the rest of my life!


    We obviously come at this from 2 different extremes. Being personally responsible for the lives of hundreds of people each day in my job I probably have a very safety orientated outlook. My view on rescue is that if our wonderful country insists on me having all the safety and communication equipment, and if I do get into trouble, then they can jolly well come and rescue me and I won't feel in debt to society in any way shape or form. After all all the various personnel are being paid anyway, and I know from being involved with Civil Defense and Coastguard that they just love an opportunity to go and rescue someone, it gives purpose to their lives. 

    So, if we are out there in the ocean and our boats are going down in the same set of extreme circumstances, and as I drift pass your sinking boat in my life raft I will very happily offer you a ride. But here's the deal - because I am providing all the boring things like raft, EPIRB, flares and all of that kind of stuff, you need to bring the fun things like beer and nibbles. And I think that even in the life raft I would like to live in a bit of style which would include my glass of Merlot at sun-downer time.

    Last modified: 18 Aug 2018 02:07 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Aug 2018 01:34
    Reply # 6580496 on 6579242
    David Thatcher wrote: All in all we feel that our 3 month holiday in New Caledonia was very inexpensive, if we had been able to carry on cruising for 6 months, or years, then the investment and compliance required for New Zealand registration and Cat 1 with have been so insignificant to not even count.
    That's fine, David.  If that's how you choose to go offshore, no-one is stopping you.  My objection is that they are trying to stop me (and Zane and other people) from going offshore in the way that we choose.

    How can we be living in a country that is sufficiently mature to be debating assisted suicide and legalising recreational drugs, but so controlling that it won't let people go and sail as they want?  Fair enough: if you can call for help, you have to have all the bells and whistles, but if you can't they should just shake you by the hand and wish you well.

    I would hope that any friends of mine would wait for my extreme ETA plus 50% before starting seriously to fret.  And then just put the word around 'has anyone seen Annie?' and not call out the cavalry.  Besides, I don't want to be rescued and feel an enormous unpaid debt to society for the rest of my life!


    Last modified: 18 Aug 2018 01:39 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Aug 2018 22:11
    Reply # 6580271 on 6579839
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:
     I am doing best I can to copy Roger's ideas in my boat refurbishment, but they can still fail me, example, as my bilge pump is going to exit into the cockpit as its the only place it can exit as my stern is sealed off aft. 
    If I remember correctly, the pump of MingMing II exits into the cockpit - although the Achilles has a large outboard well in it.

    Yip Jami, I think from memory you are correct.
    I have no cockpit well. Instead I raised the whole cockpit 6 inches (after removing the inboard engine), removed all thu hulls, and glassed over all holes below waterline.  Have no well, but instead have two drain pipes glassed in thru the transom where water can exit the cockpit.

  • 17 Aug 2018 17:23
    Reply # 6579839 on 6579325
    Anonymous wrote:
     I am doing best I can to copy Roger's ideas in my boat refurbishment, but they can still fail me, example, as my bilge pump is going to exit into the cockpit as its the only place it can exit as my stern is sealed off aft. 
    If I remember correctly, the pump of MingMing II exits into the cockpit - although the Achilles has a large outboard well in it.
  • 17 Aug 2018 14:15
    Reply # 6579477 on 6579204
    Annie wrote:
    David wrote: Annie, for the avoidance of doubt, could you confirm that you're thinking of the sail shape as shown in your avatar, which is the same as the drawing that I currently hold as the latest version, dated 6 November 2016?
    That's the one.  I just love it!
    You could indeed make this sail with straight battens and cambered panels, and the line loadings wouldn't be too bad, though those full-camber panels are always going to be more trouble than flatter panels + hinges. But then I don't know how you'd get battens of acceptable quality. Just to be absolutely sure, I could make the top sheeted batten 50mm, and find a way to make the larger double cones. My bro-in-law has a larger lathe; I owe them a visit, and could pack a piece of plastic bar in my bag.

    Was the tabernacle set at 2 degrees forward rake?

  • 17 Aug 2018 12:20
    Reply # 6579355 on 4315719

    I looked at the cat 1 checklist this morning, and was horrified at all the things I'd have to do, and to carry, if I was a Kiwi, most of it making me not one jot safer. I'm firmly with Annie and Zane on this one, and most definitely in the camp of self reliant sailors, and "if it all goes wrong, drown like a gentleman". Annie and I, each with sailing mileage over six figures , don't need a guy with a clipboard telling us how to sail.

    And anyway, I didn't figure a liferaft stowage into the design.

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software