SibLim update

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 19 Nov 2017 01:48
    Reply # 5593014 on 4315719
    Back again and back in the forecabin.  Slowly getting there.

    More on my blog.


  • 05 Nov 2017 00:20
    Reply # 5538367 on 4315719

    Still plodding on in the forecabin, but it's taking shape.  I'm going down to Nelson next week, so that will put the kibosh on my boatbuilding.  However, it will be a great break!

    You can find the latest pics on  my blog.

  • 26 Oct 2017 08:22
    Reply # 5361497 on 5355656
    Eric Andlauer wrote:
    Bonsoir

    I learned that a junkrig was sailed in slippers (Jester) or in socks (Mingming).

    Did I miss something ?

    Eric

    Well, most people would think of these as slippers, being as how they are fairly soft and made out of sheepskin.  However, they have thick and waterproof soles, so that you can go outside in the rain (or snow) if you have to, without having to change them.  But while I regard them as seaboots, this is in a strictly junkie way, ie you can wear them when you go forward to anchor, or to go on deck if you want to wave to someone sailing past.  You wouldn't want to go on the foredeck and change headsails in them! 
    Last modified: 26 Oct 2017 08:24 | Annie
  • 25 Oct 2017 23:13
    Reply # 5355656 on 5336634
    Annie Hill wrote:

    My favoured cool/cold weather deck boots are these sheepskin ones:

    I bought them last century in South Africa, and they have proved their worth in Greenland, Fiordland, Newfoundland and winters in Northland. Without socks. I have had them re-soled but apart from that they soldier on in spite of so much wear, never even requiring any stitching replaced. They are still made and I would love to buy myself a new pair to see me out, especially as they now go down to size 3 (for the past 18 years I've been clumping around in size 4!), but I can't get the order page on the website to bring up 'New Zealand'.  I can highly recommend them, to anyone who can get the order form to work.  They are much tougher than Ugg boots and have reinforcement at the heel - it's this that keeps them going.  A spray of waterproofing every now and then makes them real seaboots.

    Edit: writing this reminded me to try contacting the makers again, and this time I got a response! An early Christmas present for Annie appears to be indicated!


    Bonsoir

    I learned that a junkrig was sailed in slippers (Jester) or in socks (Mingming).

    Did I miss something ?

    Eric

  • 24 Oct 2017 21:17
    Reply # 5336634 on 4315719

    My favoured cool/cold weather deck boots are these sheepskin ones:

    I bought them last century in South Africa, and they have proved their worth in Greenland, Fiordland, Newfoundland and winters in Northland. Without socks. I have had them re-soled but apart from that they soldier on in spite of so much wear, never even requiring any stitching replaced. They are still made and I would love to buy myself a new pair to see me out, especially as they now go down to size 3 (for the past 18 years I've been clumping around in size 4!), but I can't get the order page on the website to bring up 'New Zealand'.  I can highly recommend them, to anyone who can get the order form to work.  They are much tougher than Ugg boots and have reinforcement at the heel - it's this that keeps them going.  A spray of waterproofing every now and then makes them real seaboots.

    Edit: writing this reminded me to try contacting the makers again, and this time I got a response! An early Christmas present for Annie appears to be indicated!

    Last modified: 24 Oct 2017 21:48 | Annie
  • 23 Oct 2017 22:17
    Reply # 5333973 on 4315719

    Ah New Zealand, where it's summer all the time. Sailing on the Scottish coast in May, I was glad to be wearing my alaskan sneakers when under way.

  • 23 Oct 2017 21:36
    Reply # 5333900 on 5332068
    David Tyler wrote:

    And as for seaboots ...

    They live at the foot of the companionway steps, ready to put on when your presence is needed on deck in the wee small hours, if it's raining/the spray is flying/there's a heavy dew.

    Don't they?

    No, because they fall over and are a damn nuisance all the time when the rain and spray aren't flying and they catch your toes as you go up.  Besides, unless it's seriously cold, my deck gear is bare feet.

    But they do need a handy home.


  • 23 Oct 2017 10:46
    Reply # 5332068 on 4315719

    And as for seaboots ...

    They live at the foot of the companionway steps, ready to put on when your presence is needed on deck in the wee small hours, if it's raining/the spray is flying/there's a heavy dew.

    Don't they?

  • 22 Oct 2017 20:42
    Reply # 5328882 on 5328739
    David Tyler wrote:

    Good work, and a good blog entry - save for the gross injustice that you do to those of us who also keep our shoes in the awkwardly shaped triangular space at the bottom of the clothes locker!

    When we had Missee Lee we got hold of the layout plans for the Westerly 21, her plastic younger sister, and I thought it was rather civilised that it incorporated a shoe locker.  Since then I've always been very aware of the fact that on most boats, even large ones, no place has been planned for shoes.   The best you can hope for is to tumble them into a locker together and then rummage through to find a pair.  Even when you only take a size 36, they do require somewhere to live.  And as for seaboots ...
  • 22 Oct 2017 19:49
    Reply # 5328739 on 4315719

    Good work, and a good blog entry - save for the gross injustice that you do to those of us who also keep our shoes in the awkwardly shaped triangular space at the bottom of the clothes locker!

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software