junk-rigged scamp?

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  • 16 Apr 2021 19:57
    Reply # 10319974 on 10318653
    Arne wrote:

    At almost the same weight, one could make a 16-footer which really moves under sail.

    Arne

    PS: However, David's suggested JR for it looks good to me. That rig will help avoiding capsizing in the first place...

    From Small Boats Magazine:

    Josh Colvin, who commissioned SCAMP—an acronym for Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project—wasn’t looking for an ultimate adventure boat when he approached New Zealand designer John Welsford (see WB No. 225 for a profile on Welsford and his design work). “My initial goals for the boat were based largely on a 150-mile sail down the Columbia River, from Beacon Rock to Astoria,” Colvin says. “I kept coming across backwaters and shallow estuarine areas and thinking, That’s where I really want to go, but my 16-footer was too deep, wasn’t easy to row, and if I wanted to overnight up among the reeds, wouldn’t dry out level if the tide left. So the idea I eventually took to John Welsford was for the smallest possible boat that would be able to do all of these things, but still be seaworthy enough to cope with something like the middle of the Columbia River on a breezy afternoon.”

    Horses for courses, Arne?

  • 16 Apr 2021 19:15
    Reply # 10319851 on 10315920
    David wrote:

    But I can't find an answer to one major point: what would be a suitable acronym for a junk rigged S.C.A.M.P.?

    SCAMP JR

    Simple Conversion to Advanced Maritime Propulsion Junk Rig ?

    Sailing Craft Already Modified Per Junk Rig

    Last modified: 16 Apr 2021 20:02 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Apr 2021 14:32
    Reply # 10318982 on 10309125
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Well, in my view, 500+ sold plans only proves that the Champ design looks very charming. Who wouldn’t like to be seen pottering around in a big wooden shoe?
    The objective fact is that the Champ will not self-right after a knock-down, even after the builders have taken the trouble to build it with water ballast in it. This could give some users serious or even fatal trouble.

    I, of course defend anyone’s supreme right to build a Champ, even if it isn’t as safe and robust as the promotors say it is.

    Arne


  • 16 Apr 2021 14:16
    Reply # 10318899 on 10309125

    500+ plans and kits buyers take a different view, Arne. From Wikipedia:

    Welsford considers it possibly the best boat he's designed, based on "suitability for purpose".'

    And I agree. Fitness for purpose is what it's all about.

    Clearly, your purpose is not a good match with this boat. You don't want a minimal cruising dinghy that can be built in a small garage, and can explore tidal creeks, taking the ground to camp for the night. If you want more speed, JW has the Long Steps for you, but it's a much bigger investment of time and resources to build it.

    Last modified: 16 Apr 2021 14:17 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Apr 2021 12:22
    Reply # 10318653 on 10309125
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Frankly,

    I didn’t get much charmed by the SCAMP. It looks like tub and appears to sail like one. At almost the same weight, one could make a 16-footer which really moves under sail.
    Worst of all, even though it pretends to be a half-safe family boat, it failed to self-right from 90°. It took a big and able man to reach for the cb. and then bring it back on its feet.

    Certainly not my cup of tea. I would rather look for a Drascombe or similar.

    Arne

    PS: However, David's suggested JR for it looks good to me. That rig will help avoiding capsizing in the first place...


  • 15 Apr 2021 16:36
    Reply # 10315920 on 10309125

    Recent discussions about a JRA tender got me diving deep into John Welsford's designs for inspiration and comparisons. I must say, I'm mighty impressed with the S.C.A.M.P. and its big sister, Tread Lightly, as rugged, big-little-boats that can tackle a wide range of conditions. 

    I tried scaling up the Halibut rig to 100 sq ft, but I don't think it's quite right here. For a fair weather dinghy, yes, it's great, but for a heavier more capable boat that might go coast-hopping, I'd like to see at least one more reef.

    So I did an adaptation of the Halibut sail with one more batten and 3 point sheeting, and scaled it to 9.69 sqm / 104 sq ft , and I think it may serve. It would seem to need an adjustment to the mast position, either further forward or forward raked, though (as the original balanced lug has a lot of balance area, and the Halibut rig has very little), neither of which are out of the question in a new build. For an existing boat, some forward rake seems possible, as there is quite a lot of fore and aft room in the mast trunk. The mast could be a 5m aluminium tube.

    But I can't find an answer to one major point: what would be a suitable acronym for a junk rigged S.C.A.M.P.?

    1 file
    Last modified: 15 Apr 2021 16:42 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Apr 2021 01:37
    Reply # 10313837 on 10309125

    I have nothing to contribute except enthusiasm for the undertaking!!  Arne's Halibut JR shown in the thread in the technical forum  titled:  

    Cash prize of 250 GBP - Dinghy Design Competition

    Seems like an obvious choice.  The know how as far as achieving proper balance, etc.   Dive into a project like that on this forum, and you will likely find the problem to be one of too much help rather than not enough  ;-)


                                                    Howard

  • 14 Apr 2021 02:44
    Reply # 10309840 on 10309125

    Contact John Welsford the designer.

  • 13 Apr 2021 22:15
    Message # 10309125

    Has anyone had any experience optimizing a junk-rigged scamp? I've searched the forum and come up dry. Best to all. 

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