S2 6.7 Junk Rig Conversion

  • 12 May 2021 17:50
    Reply # 10473722 on 10459113
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Karl Aigner wrote:

    Hi Arne, I have read your mast and boom construction with great interest and because I have 2 long alu tubes left from which I want to make a yard and boom like you did I have one question: Why did you pad them with PVC , for appearance reason or has it any special function ?



    Karl, I padded the yard (and boom) partly to avoid metal to metal noise and partly because I don't think aluminium should rub on aluminium (or any other metal). The forward batten pockets on the four last junk-sails have also been from PVC. 

    Since I don't sail across oceans, I don't have to worry about battens tapping on the mast in the no-wind-plus-old-swell situations, but still. Actually, I think it would be a good idea to make the forward batten pockets a bit oversize and then wrap the battens with an old carpet or something to improve the total padding at the mast.

    Clear as mud, right?

    Arne

    PS: I very rarely add details to my rigs for appearance reasons 

    ☺...

    Last modified: 12 May 2021 17:58 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 12 May 2021 17:07
    Reply # 10473553 on 10456773
    David wrote:

    [...] you can cobble together most of the running rigging requirements out if just about whatever comes to hand, at least on a temporary basis.. And you can save a lot of money by using alternatives to conventional blocks. For example on my little catamaran I have substituted many of the blocks for low friction rings, and sheaveless blocks produced by Ronstan which they call 'Shocks'. They seem to work very well, are inexpensive, and if I was doing a small junk rig I would use these for a lot of the applications. For example the Shocks seem a logical choice to use on the sheetlets/mainsheet connection.

    David,

    There has definitely been some cobbling happening on my boat. I am enjoying being at the stage where it is all finally just sticks and strings. Making the knots to hold it all together is fun. It would be more fun if the weather was a little warmer. Climbing around with cold fingers above 40 degree water is not something I want to do forever.

    I am attempting to rig the sheets with an even more stingy method than the Ronstan Shocks. I bought a quantity of plastic rope thimbles. With some sanding and maybe some McLube Sailkote I hope to use these plastic eyes as 'blocks' to connect the mainsheet to the sheetlets.

    It astounds me that you were able to build and rig an entire boat in much less time than my still unfinished conversion. How do you like your new boat. I think it is an ECO 55, is that right?

    Last modified: 13 May 2021 14:27 | Anonymous member
  • 12 May 2021 16:59
    Reply # 10473514 on 10456886
    Arne wrote:

    On the last two boats I have just lashed the halyard blocks to the yard. To make sure it would not slide, I added a couple of strips of non-slip tape.
    See how I did it on my Ingeborg, in 2015 (page 12). It still stays put...

    Hi Arne,

    All of your most recent writeups have been very helpful. I have screenshots from your 'Fixes, adjustments and improvements on Ingeborg' saved on my phone for quick reference.

    I also finally got my head wrapped around what you described in 'Peaking up the junk sail, ver 20111214b'. Moving the YHP further up the yard and rigging the LHP as a THP (Throat Hauling Parrel) seems like a good idea. I think I understand how this will provide better leverage to peak up the yard.

    I am attempting to rig my sail as you described in your write ups, including lashing the halyard block to the yard.

    Last modified: 12 May 2021 17:48 | Anonymous member
  • 10 May 2021 07:14
    Reply # 10459113 on 6872873

    Hi Arne, I have read your mast and boom construction with great interest and because I have 2 long alu tubes left from which I want to make a yard and boom like you did I have one question: Why did you pad them with PVC , for appearance reason or has it any special function ?

  • 09 May 2021 10:36
    Reply # 10456886 on 6872873
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    On the last two boats I have just lashed the halyard blocks to the yard. To make sure it would not slide, I added a couple of strips of non-slip tape.
    See how I did it on my Ingeborg, in 2015 (page 12). It still stays put...

    Arne

  • 09 May 2021 10:11
    Reply # 10456773 on 10455930
    Scott wrote:

    Doing everything I can to get sailing again. Still need a better sling point attachment. And a luff hauling parrel. And sheets. And sheetlets. And ... 

    Well, you are making good forward progress . The Halyard, (sling attachment), can just be a lashing around the yard with a substantial saddle on the underside of the yard to locate it and stop it slipping forward. Better though to have a split lashing to spread the load. Regarding your other control lines The good thing about a small junk rig yacht is that you can cobble together most of the running rigging requirements out if just about whatever comes to hand, at least on a temporary basis.. And you can save a lot of money by using alternatives to conventional blocks. For example on my little catamaran I have substituted many of the blocks for low friction rings, and sheaveless blocks produced by Ronstan which they call 'Shocks'. They seem to work very well, are inexpensive, and if I was doing a small junk rig I would use these for a lot of the applications. For example the Shocks seem a logical choice to use on the sheetlets/mainsheet connection.

  • 09 May 2021 00:46
    Reply # 10455930 on 6872873

    Doing everything I can to get sailing again. Still need a better sling point attachment. And a luff hauling parrel. And sheets. And sheetlets. And ... 

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  • 27 Apr 2021 15:03
    Reply # 10371111 on 6872873

    With the help of a couple of friends I was able to get the mast up and the boat launched. It is reassuring that the mast has remained vertical for two days now with gusts up around 20 knots.

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  • 05 Jan 2021 16:58
    Reply # 9694210 on 9425495
    Annie wrote:

    [...] The rotating hood allows me to have pleny of air moving through the boat, even in heavy rain from astern: it also allows me to use the hood as a wind scoop.  It is a lovely place to contemplate the morning with a cup of tea.  Oh yes - it's an excellent place to keep watch and manage the sail(s)!

    I found your argument convincing. This seems like the simplest solution for me to sail in the rain without getting completely soaked and to sail in the sun without getting directly cooked.

    The first time I read through the rotating pram hood section of PJR I did not understand how it operates or how I would make one. In the last few weeks I read this section again and still had no idea. Then I looked at the photos and details you shared here. I was still not able to get it straight in my head.

    After going back and forth between your photos and the information in PJR several times I am now confident in my understanding of the pramhood construction and operation. The pictures were, as you hoped, worth a thousand words.

    Will you answer two questions about the pram hood arrangement on Fanshi?

    First, would you please share the actual dimension of the rings 'E' and 'F' from PJR Figure 13.15? I am considering using 1/2" plywood.

    Second, can you confirm that my understanding of the companionway arrangement on Fanshi is correct? It looks like there is a section of the deck that will prevent the companionway from being opened completely. To enter from the cockpit you will need to sort of climb under the deck and to enter from the deck you will need to go straight down the circular hatch. Did I get that right?

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    Last modified: 07 Jan 2021 22:11 | Anonymous member
  • 13 Dec 2020 04:13
    Reply # 9425495 on 6872873

    I originally planned to extend the deck over the after bulkhead, but realised that it would make it very uncomfortable to sit there.  Possibly I could get my head under it, but few other people could and leaning back against the cabin is a nice place to lounge.  The 'eyebrow' along the edge of the teak deck appears to prevent drips.

    Dodgers, hard or soft are made on the assumption that a boat is always head to wind.  However in tidal waters (and marinas, for that matter), the wind is not infrequently from the side or even directly astern.  Then the fixed dodger acts as a funnel for wind and rain.  This was the main reason for my going to the effort of installing a pram hood opening.  The rotating hood allows me to have pleny of air moving through the boat, even in heavy rain from astern: it also allows me to use the hood as a wind scoop.  It is a lovely place to contemplate the morning with a cup of tea.  Oh yes - it's an excellent place to keep watch and manage the sail(s)!


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    Last modified: 13 Dec 2020 04:16 | Anonymous member
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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