Frøken Sørensen, a Greif 650, 15sqm Jollenkreuzer

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  • 01 Sep 2020 15:55
    Reply # 9204350 on 1360886
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Ooops!
    Today I received a call from the fellow I sold Frøken Sørensen to in 2016: On Sunday he managed to capsize her! A combination of an uncontrolled gybe in some big sternwaves from a motor vessel, plus snags with the sheets (there was some wind)  -  and no ballast, flipped her.
    Result: A wet but otherwise OK skipper, a bent mast and a number of bent battens, rips in the sail, a lost cockpit hatch, etc. etc...
    These damages most probably was done during the rather brutal 'recovery' of the boat.

    I volunteered to have a closer look at the sail when it has dried.
    Guess if I am glad I chose to keep Ingeborg in 2016...

    Arne


  • 01 Sep 2016 23:35
    Reply # 4222793 on 1360886
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Good, Annie.

    As for selling Fantail with a loss  -  don't forget all the money you saved on house rent while living on board her!

    Arne 

  • 01 Sep 2016 23:32
    Reply # 4222791 on 1360886

    The boat without a doubt.  It will keep you young and fit, so you will be independent until you die.  Problem solved :-)!  I have no intention of moving off SibLim, except feet first.

  • 01 Sep 2016 13:09
    Reply # 4221788 on 1360886

    But I am sure we all agree that a boat, hopefully junk rigged, is a wonderful investment - in happiness  :)

    I am looking at my retirement fund, so this is a key consideration - do I spend it on a boat, adventures and memories, or do I save it for when I may have to go into a car-home.  I think the boat wins (plus a long walk on a short boat when it comes to it!) 

    Last modified: 01 Sep 2016 13:10 | Anonymous member
  • 31 Aug 2016 21:48
    Reply # 4220996 on 1360886
    Well done, Arne.  It's always sad to say goodbye to a beloved boat, but good to see her go to someone who appreciates her.

    If the boat is in the condition where all you need to do is 'add water', then my belief is that it shouldn't be hard to sell.  I have worked as a yacht broker on several occasions and in more than one country and the thing that has always astonished me is the dreadful state in which so many boats are offered for sale.

    It seems that fewer and fewer people are buying small boats.  Even since I came to New Zealand they have dropped significantly in value.  If it's any consolation, Arne, I sold Fantail for 15% less than I paid for her and quite apart from re-rigging her, I had upgraded the interior, replaced all the lights and wiring, replaced and added to the ground tackle, replaced the sea toilet, spent a lot on overhauling the engine, repainted the boat and decks with polyurethane, rebuilt the companionway, bought a new cooker, rebuilt the water tank and no doubt did quite a few other jobs.  You certainly don't buy small boats as a good financial investment!


  • 30 Aug 2016 10:54
    Reply # 4218134 on 1360886
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Steve,

    I wouldn't call it salesmanship as long as I sell with a loss. I bought her for 28.000NOK and sold her for 30.000 (2.767£). Converting her to JR may well cost up to 20.000, even if I reckon the sailcloth as 'free' ("it's lying around anyway"). However, over those three and a half seasons I have accumulated nearly 90 outings in her, so she certainly has paid me back.

    The prices on small boats are ridiculously low in Norway, just as the prices on houses are ridiculously high. If one refurbishes or upgrades a small boat, one can never expect to get the money back. In fact, getting 30.000NOK for a 21-footer, without an engine and without a millimetre of electric wiring on board, is quite a feat.

    What made the deal was of course mainly the performance of the JR. This combined with the easily driven hull with a super-efficient rudder, let me demonstrate some (to him) spectacular manoeuvres, which I bet he had never done or seen on any other boat.  Sailing back into the berth between rows of other yachts was the icing of the cake. I also underlined that the 6.5m Greif was stronger built than anything in her class. This can be felt when stomping along on her deck or in the cockpit. Just think of a 21-footer weighing 740kg, and not a gram of it is ballast.

    The new owner will keep her in another harbour within Stavanger (Dusavig), so the delivery trip is only to be a few miles. This also lets me give a hand and make sure the owner doesn't get problems with sorting the lines. He is an experienced sailor, so I think he will be all right, quite soon.

    I am kind of sad-glad to see FS go, but I think the new owner is a decent bloke who deserves her, and will look well after her.

    Arne

     

    Last modified: 30 Aug 2016 11:03 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 30 Aug 2016 00:24
    Reply # 4217534 on 1360886
    Deleted user

    Wow!  That's a testament to the pleasures of the cambered junk rig . . . or to Arne's salesmanship!  Congratulations, Arne.

  • 29 Aug 2016 22:58
    Reply # 4217464 on 1360886
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Hm,

    that was a quick one. Frøken Sørensen was sold today after less than 24h on the market. The demo sail did the trick.

    Arne

    Last modified: 29 Aug 2016 22:58 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 28 Aug 2016 20:57
    Reply # 4214906 on 1360886
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Everything has an end. I just put Frøken Sørensen for sale. She has given me and my friends lots of fun.

    The good news is that I am to keep Ingeborg...


    Arne 

     

     

    Last modified: 09 Jun 2017 10:48 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 07 May 2016 23:41
    Reply # 4008239 on 1360886
    Great stuff, Arne.  I'm green with envy!
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