Junk rigged H 28

  • 12 Nov 2021 21:46
    Reply # 12122871 on 12121879
    Arne wrote:

    In Norway we don't have an operational word for Sir.

    Interesting;  language says a lot about culture.  I don't know much about Norway, but what I like, judging from the pictures I have seen, is how beautifully many of the buildings are painted, even simple barns.  That says something, too.
  • 12 Nov 2021 15:32
    Reply # 12121879 on 12118911
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Graham,
    I'm sure I had nothing to do with that SJR H28 thread. He clearly must have borrowed one of the master sails, which is fine with me  -  that's the whole idea with it.

    The fact that he "Sired" me made me smile. I can't say I am a particularly proud man, and not that proud of being a Norwegian either. Still, I am proud of this:

    In Norway we don't have an operational word for Sir.

    Arne

    PS: Sometimes, like here, the search facility on the Member's Area didn't find that SJR H18  thread. Then I went to HOME and used the Google search at the bottom of the page. That worked.

  • 11 Nov 2021 23:44
    Reply # 12120243 on 12119209
    Arne wrote:

    Graham
    I can't remember to have drawn any rig for a H28 on Nz. It appears that the fellow has printed out a sail from my stack of master sails and then stuck it to that boat plan. Like you, I would not have positioned the sail that low, and I would most probably have chosen a taller sail as well...


    Arne


    Arne, I must have misunderstood what he said (topic titled SJR H28, Technical Forum), but I thought he'd been having difficulty getting the sail in the right place and you offered a solution.  I think he even thanked you!  But maybe that was for providing your wonderful files as a resource.  The batten length on Arion was 4.6m, so the sail's aspect-ratio was a little higher, and it worked splendidly.  If I ever start the project, I'll review my options seriously.  By that time, I'd have sailed the boat for a couple of seasons and will have a better idea of what I want.  The bermudan sloop rig has a reputation for being superbly balanced, allowing finger-tip control of the tiller at all times, and even the ability to walk away from the helm for periods of time.  I'd want to retain that quality.
    Last modified: 11 Nov 2021 23:45 | Anonymous member
  • 11 Nov 2021 15:56
    Reply # 12119209 on 12118911
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Graham
    I can't remember to have drawn any rig for a H28 on Nz. It appears that the fellow has printed out a sail from my stack of master sails and then stuck it to that boat plan. Like you, I would not have positioned the sail that low, and I would most probably have chosen a taller sail as well...


    Arne


    Last modified: 11 Nov 2021 18:52 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 11 Nov 2021 13:35
    Message # 12118911

    I noticed on the JRA fora that Arne designed a junk rig for the New Zealand version of the H 28 (same as my new boat) a couple of years ago.  (See drawing below).  I suspect it may not have been built, as the person who posted originally is now noted as a 'deleted user', meaning, I assume, that he is no longer a member of the JRA, and I can find no further posts.  I have copied the drawing to file away, although, sadly, it will be probably be three years before I can consider doing a conversion, since I am now totally broke, nada, skint, empty pockets!  And I need an anchor winch first.  I may even have to invest in new SS rigging wire to get sailing offshore.  If I ever find myself with $10K in my pocket, I will consider the idea.  I am not looking forward to sailing under bermudan rig again, but I wanted this boat badly, and that is the price, for now.

    I like the rig Arne designed for the H 28.  It is almost identical to the one I had on Arion, both in design criteria and sail area.  I know it would work beautifully.  The sail I fitted to Blue Moon, with its low-angled yard, handles very nicely, too, and seems to have little stress on it, though this is probably a result of the beautiful craftsmanship in Paul Thompson's sail, especially the strong tablings at luff and leach.  The angle of the yard, for me, is simply a function of how much balance you need in the sail, and this is related to mast position.  On Blue Moon, the mast was a bit too far aft, and required as much sail area forward of the mast as possible (22-25%).  On the H 28, the only place the mast can go is a foot or so forward of the coachroof, on the foredeck, and this dictates about 10% balance, where a high-angled yard is appropriate.

    The only thing I would change with Arne's drawing is to raise the sail up vertically by about 400mm, as I like the tack to be higher off the deck, both to clear the lifelines and pulpit (I don't want to remove them), and so I can easily go forward along the windward deck to the bows at sea when running with the sail squared out.  I like to sit in the pulpit and admire the view as the boat thunders along before the waves.  That would raise the CE when the sail is fully hoisted but the boat has a very high ballast ratio, plus the CE comes down when you reef.

    Anyway, it is just a dream for now.

    View enlarged image here.



    Last modified: 11 Nov 2021 13:40 | Anonymous member
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