Quick Update, Proa 'One Force' from Balkan Shipyards

  • 18 Mar 2023 18:10
    Reply # 13136438 on 13136039
    Anonymous wrote:

    Hi Rael,


    what an interesting topic!

    I find fascinating the mix of sailing and archeology. In the Bronze Age and before, also in the Med there were sea peoples sailing big distances. But nothing comparable with the immensity of the Pacific Ocean and the distances covered by the proas and their crews. I searched a little bit on the web about this incredible epics and now understand the shunting, which I find a genius invention.

    In Germany there is a man who sailed a proa from Taiwan to Rapa Nui in 2017. The project was to make stops in the various island on the way to Rapa Nui and take local sailors board to the next island. His main goal was to start a renascence of the of pacific traditional way of sailing.  I think probably also because of guilt feelings. I read that as the europeans arrived there, one the first thing they made was to destroy the big proas and prohibit the sailing to the locals, in order to better control this vaste area. 

    Here the link for his homepage and a video of his own proa (unfortunately just German).

    http://www.burghard-pieske.com/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfcFc1oSomk

    Keep shunting!!!

    Mauro

    Very interesting! Thanks Mauro, I enjoyed the video and the photos on the site.

    I know that Proa, yet never knew what happened with it, the fact it made it to Rapa Nui proves the point, Proas are Strong!!!

    I will go to my Dutch friend and watch the Video again, he can translate, I will bring the beer....

    Shunting is amazing, it's hard and awkward at times, though it changes everything to do with boat design, shunters are fast, and very cheap to build, yet the strongest of multies and the stablest of monos.....

    Keep Shunting,

    Balkan Shipyards



  • 18 Mar 2023 07:56
    Reply # 13136039 on 13121681

    Hi Rael,


    what an interesting topic!

    I find fascinating the mix of sailing and archeology. In the Bronze Age and before, also in the Med there were sea peoples sailing big distances. But nothing comparable with the immensity of the Pacific Ocean and the distances covered by the proas and their crews. I searched a little bit on the web about this incredible epics and now understand the shunting, which I find a genius invention.

    In Germany there is a man who sailed a proa from Taiwan to Rapa Nui in 2017. The project was to make stops in the various island on the way to Rapa Nui and take local sailors board to the next island. His main goal was to start a renascence of the of pacific traditional way of sailing.  I think probably also because of guilt feelings. I read that as the europeans arrived there, one the first thing they made was to destroy the big proas and prohibit the sailing to the locals, in order to better control this vaste area. 

    Here the link for his homepage and a video of his own proa (unfortunately just German).

    http://www.burghard-pieske.com/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfcFc1oSomk

    Keep shunting!!!

    Mauro

  • 17 Mar 2023 22:03
    Reply # 13135737 on 13135518
    Anonymous wrote:

    By chance, I was given an original copy of the AYRS booklet on The Transatlantic Races from 1970, it's booklet no. 71 available for free here:

    The Transatlantic Races

    It has the very successful transatlantic proa Cheers on the cover and several articles concerning junk rigs and proas (but not proas with junk rigs, although John Morwood does hint at it being a good idea, he's also quite blunt about Col. Hasler picking the wrong type of Chinese/Malay junk rig to base his western ideas on). It's a fascinating historical document. The article starting on p.80 explains the shunting process well. 

    The scans of the pictures are appallingly bad, if anyone is interested I can scan any pictures, just let me know and I'll put it on the to-do list and start another forum thread in due course.

    Thanks Jan!

    So much to read, I got lost.... I enjoyed reading about Cheers though, was nice to get into Richards mind for a bit.

    Yea, Cheers promoted Proas and Shunting, Mr Newick brought the proa to the 20th century by changing everything that was known in the Pacific!

    He started off by inverting the whole concept from the Multi with the least RM to the Multi with the most RM, he just turned the boat 180 degrees around by inventing the First Atlantic Proa. These craft place the Vaka to windward and Ama to lee, weight to windward we call them, these sail pressing down on the ama, like a trimaran does. Pacific Proas on the other hand, are weight to Leeward, they place the small ama to windward, and have the least RM, yet these are the strongest and least stressed by compression loads...

    He went on to inventing the lifting rudders which have become the standard of all western Proas, 2 dagger cases at each end of the Vaka, the aft dagger is lowered and the front one is raised, each one has a rudder on it's lower edge.

    Cheers got backwinded during testing and capsized. Shunters are backwinded once caught wrong side to the wind, Pacific Proas press down on their amas, Atlantic Proas fly their amas and capsize... No Problem he went on to invent the first Proa LeePod, he ended up inventing the first self righting multihull in the world....

    A special man indeed

    A tacker in mind, yet a shunter at soul... 

    Keep Shunting, Balkan Shipyards

    P.S. Below an image of my Vaka and the first stages of the LeePod, early construction stages...


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  • 17 Mar 2023 18:25
    Reply # 13135518 on 13121681

    By chance, I was given an original copy of the AYRS booklet on The Transatlantic Races from 1970, it's booklet no. 71 available for free here:

    The Transatlantic Races

    It has the very successful transatlantic proa Cheers on the cover and several articles concerning junk rigs and proas (but not proas with junk rigs, although John Morwood does hint at it being a good idea, he's also quite blunt about Col. Hasler picking the wrong type of Chinese/Malay junk rig to base his western ideas on). It's a fascinating historical document. The article starting on p.80 explains the shunting process well. 

    The scans of the pictures are appallingly bad, if anyone is interested I can scan any pictures, just let me know and I'll put it on the to-do list and start another forum thread in due course.

  • 17 Mar 2023 08:13
    Reply # 13134933 on 13133742
    Anonymous wrote:

    I know nothing about shunting, apart what I learned in your videos.

    But I am amazed and full of admiration for your building skills and your production, and the way you keep it cheap and simple. 

    You live in a cold climat, do you imagine building a proximité with a cabin and very basic live-aboard possibility?

    Also, any chance to see you shunting on the atlantic?

     Happy U like Balkan Style Patrick, Thanks for understanding our main goal in boat design! many skip this, some like, some don't but most miss the point....

     Proas are the 'Peoples Boat' meaning, these craft appeared in the pacific before any other Multyhull. They are the simplest, the cheapest and the easiest to build! 

    Even before money existed, everything had a cost, the rate was probably man hour for man hour... Or man day for man day, sunrise to sunset.

    Cheap for them was less logs, less cutting less moving, man hours... Less ropes, less sail area, efficient, cheap and strong! These craft discovered the biggest country in the world, Polynesia, from Hawaii in the north to New Zealand in the south. Catamarans and Trimarans came later...

    Proas are Strong! These craft are all about tension, with their masts planted on the hull, a floating keel to windward, a single shroud connects it to the mast, and now you have the triangle of tension. As sail fills, shroud pulls Ama (small Canoe) up, Ama's weight goes up shroud and comes down mast onto the Vaka (big canoe). Nothing can break! Akas (cross beams, connecting hulls) can be simple bamboo, they only have to keep the two hulls apart.

    On Catamarans all loads are compression loads, and these are huge. lifting a heavy hull to windward, and planting all that weight on the akas between the hulls is no joke!

    The problem gets even bigger, since compression loads on bridge deck are actually double the hull weight, since mast is places between the hulls, meaning, the fulcrum is half boats width away. Meaning, as windward hull is pulled up by mast head, leeward hull is far away to lee, since it's half boat beam away, yet it is the fulcrum, windward hulls weight doubles in compression loads at mid ship. 

    So the big heavy windward hull of the Catamaran, has doubled it's weight in compression loads over bridge deck. 

    Shunters are special! Yet no one makes them! you can't buy them... The most amazing craft of all! The most misunderstood too, the forgotten ship that discovered the whole Pacific, a tension boat, the cheapest, strongest and fastest of all, made by the people, for the people......     

    Keep Shunting, Balkan Shipyards.

    We aim to keep the tradition alive, to make Proas even simpler yet much safer! The Junk Rig added us more safety than any other Proa in the world! I'm grateful and proud to be part of this community....

    Proas for cold weather? probably not... It is what it is, sorry. 

    A cabin I have, inside I can sleep, rest cook, 2 bunks... I even have a bucket, for a head....

    The Atlantic, I hope to cross it! with this boat... But there's lots to do till then... Time will tell, may the Force B with us....

    Balkan Shipyards 

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  • 16 Mar 2023 13:12
    Reply # 13133742 on 13121681

    I know nothing about shunting, apart what I learned in your videos.

    But I am amazed and full of admiration for your building skills and your production, and the way you keep it cheap and simple. 

    You live in a cold climat, do you imagine building a proximité with a cabin and very basic live-aboard possibility?

    Also, any chance to see you shunting on the atlantic?

  • 07 Mar 2023 05:54
    Reply # 13122289 on 13121994
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    Junk rigging very soon... "One Force" is finally One! As 2 hulls come together, as 

    That looks solid. Do you transport it that way or take it apart?

    Can't wait to see it in the water.

    Unlash and load on trailer, then lash it all up on the beach. She's over 4 meters wide, yet fit's easily onto a standard trailer 4 long by 2 wide.

    Happy U like her, Thanx

    Keep Shunting, Balkan Shipyards

  • 06 Mar 2023 23:13
    Reply # 13121994 on 13121681
    Anonymous wrote:

    Junk rigging very soon... "One Force" is finally One! As 2 hulls come together, as 

    That looks solid. Do you transport it that way or take it apart?

    Can't wait to see it in the water.

  • 06 Mar 2023 19:32
    Message # 13121681

    Junk rigging very soon... "One Force" is finally One! As 2 hulls come together, as winter finally heads to the southern hemisphere, as 7 day weeks are just not enough....

    So here he is finally looking like a boat

    Keep Shunting, Balkan Shipyards

    VIDEO BELOW

    https://youtu.be/ApOQKX6TyM8

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       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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