conversion: mast and tabernacle begging bowl out for advice

  • 13 Jun 2020 22:54
    Reply # 9035418 on 9009463

    Thanks chaps, back to square one on the mast!


  • 07 Jun 2020 08:12
    Reply # 9020236 on 9009463
    Anonymous wrote:

    When I acquired the Atlanta 8.5 just before lockdown, I thought I was buying a blank canvas, after all, she has never been dipped or even rigged. But I do have a decent-looking Proctor mast, which from the drawings looks like a cut-down Moody 333 mast. There is a galvanised steel tabernacle too, and an unused set of shrouds. So I wondered, why not, having decided on the new location for the mast, extend the tabernacle down to the fore cabin sole by means of a steel post?

    This raises other questions, particularly, is the mast strong enough to reuse it a) with shrouds, b)  unstayed? How could I tell?


    hi Chris

    I agree with the rest of te comments. Your mast and tabernacle are not suitable AT ALL, to rig a modern junk....unless you go stayed as some old traditional and very localized chinese rigs, for special purposes, were designed. Even that, the spreaders are goin to be on your way. My rec. , forget about it, try to sell it and get a reliable mast.

    Also, from a tabernacle point of design, it is considred that the burry and therefore the alternative tabernacle should be ABOUT, 1/10 of the mast legth, and never less than about 100cm....all of that to be taken with a grain of salt and depending in many considerations.


    good luck


  • 07 Jun 2020 07:40
    Reply # 9020229 on 9009463

    Chris, these are for a stayed bermudan rig and cannot be used for junk rig, either stayed or unstayed. I suggest that if you really want JR, you need to sell them on and get a mast that is designed from scratch to be unstayed.The stayed masts on Colvin-designed boats are a special case, designed right from the beginning to suit the boats and sails they are used with, they are not adapted from bermudan or gaff rigs.

  • 06 Jun 2020 18:23
    Reply # 9019311 on 9009463

    Hello David,

    I was wrong about the tabernacle, it looks like stainless not galv.

    The mast appears to be in very good condition. It is oval in section, about 10" in the greater diameter at the foot and 8" at the head. Is oval bad? I did see a round section mast in a breakers the other day.

    I have the Proctor Masts drawing for it, it is a Moody 333 mast shortened 4' at the thin and and 2' at the thick end. The 333 carried 540 sq ft of sail.

    If I had started this a few years earlier, I might have educated myself on the finer points of mast design, but I doubt if there is sufficient time remaining!

    Reading around, I see that JR boats with stayed masts exist but are unfashionable. I like the simplicity of an unstayed mast, and the idea of one which could also be dropped fills me with delight.

    Chris

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    Last modified: 06 Jun 2020 18:24 | Anonymous member
  • 03 Jun 2020 07:10
    Reply # 9011355 on 9009463

    Chris,

    In general terms, a stayed mast is designed in a completely different way from an unstayed mast, and so is a tabernacle to suit either. So that I would have to guess that your Proctor mast cannot be used unstayed, and if stayed, will not suit the JR.

    To enable us to be more specific, can you post some photos?

  • 02 Jun 2020 14:59
    Message # 9009463

    When I acquired the Atlanta 8.5 just before lockdown, I thought I was buying a blank canvas, after all, she has never been dipped or even rigged. But I do have a decent-looking Proctor mast, which from the drawings looks like a cut-down Moody 333 mast. There is a galvanised steel tabernacle too, and an unused set of shrouds. So I wondered, why not, having decided on the new location for the mast, extend the tabernacle down to the fore cabin sole by means of a steel post?

    This raises other questions, particularly, is the mast strong enough to reuse it a) with shrouds, b)  unstayed? How could I tell?


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