Redwing

  • 03 Sep 2019 00:03
    Reply # 7860723 on 7859803
    Anonymous wrote:

    On my last two boats, I have given the rigs a taller mast and thus more halyard drift (than on my Johanna). This has let me move the halyard’s slingpoint 5% aft of the middle of the yard. It could even be an idea to move it 10% aft. This has had two effects:

    ·         The halyard has a bit peaking effect with the sail hoisted, and the YHP (moved 2/3 up the yard) and the THP see lighter loads.

    ·         The sail furls fast and ‘by the book’.

    These days I therefore encourage those who are to rig with a new JR, to fit a tall enough mast. It is easier to shorten a mast than to lengthen it. In addition, a better halyard drift gives more freedom to adjust the sail’s fore-aft position to get the steering balance perfect.

    Arne

    PS: Gary, great to see that you have crossed the ‘sound barrier’  -  seven knots. Only this summer did we manage the same in my Ingeborg. With plenty of wind from behind, and only 4 of 7 panels up, we stayed above seven knots for several minutes, and touched 7.4kts.

     


    I did move the sling point about 150mm aft when I put the sail back on as the batten pockets seem to have altered how the sail hangs. I sometimes wish I had made the mast half a metre longer.
  • 02 Sep 2019 11:00
    Reply # 7859803 on 644008
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    On my last two boats, I have given the rigs a taller mast and thus more halyard drift (than on my Johanna). This has let me move the halyard’s slingpoint 5% aft of the middle of the yard. It could even be an idea to move it 10% aft. This has had two effects:

    ·         The halyard has a bit peaking effect with the sail hoisted, and the YHP (moved 2/3 up the yard) and the THP see lighter loads.

    ·         The sail furls fast and ‘by the book’.

    These days I therefore encourage those who are to rig with a new JR, to fit a tall enough mast. It is easier to shorten a mast than to lengthen it. In addition, a better halyard drift gives more freedom to adjust the sail’s fore-aft position to get the steering balance perfect.

    Arne

    PS: Gary, great to see that you have crossed the ‘sound barrier’  -  seven knots. Only this summer did we manage the same in my Ingeborg. With plenty of wind from behind, and only 4 of 7 panels up, we stayed above seven knots for several minutes, and touched 7.4kts.

     


  • 02 Sep 2019 08:51
    Reply # 7859709 on 7798043
    Gary Pic wrote:

    One thing that is different in the handling of my sail since I added the batten pockets is the sail not longer drops evenly when reefing or furling. The aft end drops first....not sure why yet.

    The same thing always happened on Arion, probably due to friction.  The answer was to keep tension on the yard hauling parrel as I eased the halyard, as this keeps the yard peaked up and the battens come down parallel.  To make it easier, being solo, I installed rope clutches for both the YHP and the LHP.  I would ease the halyard with one hand and haul in the YHP with the other.  Once one panel was down, I'd let the YHP tail go (the clutch kept it taut) and take the slack out of the LHP as well, or my experience was it could cause a tangle if left slack.  Then I would haul in some of the sheet too, before easing some more halyard and repeating the sequence.  I would sometimes forget to release the YHP and LHP clutches before trying to hoist the sail, wondering why it wouldn't go up!  I will install the same system on Blue Moon if I convert the boat to a proper junk this summer.
  • 02 Sep 2019 00:28
    Reply # 7859316 on 7859295
    Gary Pick wrote:

    One of Rosemary's photos from Saturday.

    Great photo, love Mount Warning in the background.  Fist time I have seen it looking east!
  • 02 Sep 2019 00:01
    Reply # 7859295 on 644008

    One of Rosemary's photos from Saturday.

    1 file
  • 01 Sep 2019 02:44
    Reply # 7858580 on 644008

    An excellent bit of sailing yesterday with David Webb.  We had everything from very light airs to 15 knots plus. Redwing broke her previous record of 6.8 knots and managed 7.2 knots. There was an ebb tide helping but I'm still impressed. It's good sailing with David I he knows how to get that bit extra out of Redwing.  This time it was one of us  on the foredeck equals an extra knot.:)

    Rosemary has taken some excellent photos and video of Redwing sailing in in a good breeze.

    Last modified: 01 Sep 2019 02:49 | Anonymous member
  • 27 Jul 2019 03:22
    Reply # 7798994 on 7798658
    Anonymous wrote:
    Anonymous wrote:

    One thing that is different in the handling of my sail since I added the batten pockets is the sail not longer drops evenly when reefing or furling. The aft end drops first....not sure why yet.

    Batten parrels or battens inding up on the mast? Whenever I could not get the sail on 'Footprints' to drop properly it was an indication that some of my lines had gotten out of adjustment, or the yard hauling parrel had not been loosened off properly.
    I’ll pay attention to that and see if it’s the problem. It doesn’t really worry me too much but it looks a bit messy to start with.
  • 26 Jul 2019 21:27
    Reply # 7798658 on 7798043
    Anonymous wrote:

    One thing that is different in the handling of my sail since I added the batten pockets is the sail not longer drops evenly when reefing or furling. The aft end drops first....not sure why yet.

    Batten parrels or battens inding up on the mast? Whenever I could not get the sail on 'Footprints' to drop properly it was an indication that some of my lines had gotten out of adjustment, or the yard hauling parrel had not been loosened off properly.
  • 26 Jul 2019 13:22
    Reply # 7798043 on 644008

    One thing that is different in the handling of my sail since I added the batten pockets is the sail not longer drops evenly when reefing or furling. The aft end drops first....not sure why yet.

  • 26 Jul 2019 12:56
    Reply # 7797985 on 644008

    Got in another pleasant little sail last weekend, once again just on the river. I had a couple of mates onboard, one of whom is an excellent cook which made anchoring overnight in a sheltered spot extra nice. 

    At the moment I’m gearing up for the next bit of rot repair, namely the starboard cabin side. To make the job as painless as possible I have precut the new ply sides and fibreglassed them. I will next primer and top coat both sides. I’m going to allow four days for the job which should be long enough. The plan is to remove the windows which will allow me to lay the new panels flush against the sides and mark the window positions. It should then be a “simple matter “ to set the power saw to the ply thickness just above the side deck and run a cut parallel with the deck. Remove the old ply, fit a buttstrap to back the bottom join then glue and screw the new cabin side in place. Then fibreglass tape the top and bottom joints.

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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