Redwing

  • 27 May 2019 22:11
    Reply # 7461585 on 7454733

    I have been considering the batten pockets on my planned sail.  For various reasons, (not in the least that they are free and readily-available) I am planning to use bamboo battens myself.  Unlike aluminium, they do not come in standard sizes nor are they  perfectly straight and they tend to be tapered.  That being so, batten pockets would have to be a pretty loose fit, which would mean some would fit better than others.

    On Badger, instead of sewing pockets, we used about half a dozen straps, which made it a lot easier to change the batten at sea (you just had to locate each strap, poke the batten through, tie it at one end and then hoist sail up far enough to tie the other end.  Much easier than trying to stretch the whole, reefed sail out.)  I was wondering whether to extrapolate this concept: make the straps each, say 50mm wide and then line them with Velcro.  This way each strap could be held snugly around the varying widths of the bamboos.  It is quite difficult to force Velcro apart - it really works by pulling one end and 'ripping' it open; if it did tend to open, a couple of stitches taken on either side would suffice.

    I'd be interested in comments.  Am I worrying too much about the bamboos being a loose fit in the batten pockets?

  • 27 May 2019 14:20
    Reply # 7454733 on 644008
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Gary,

    I never understood why you dropped fitting batten pockets in the first place. When you have gained experience with this version of the same sail, could you write up your reasoning behind the two versions and then tell us how you feel about the change? (Are you still using battens from bamboo?)

    Personally, I have only made one junksail with tied-on battens  -  from bamboo (JRA NL 26, p.13). Compared to later sails, assembled with either amateur method A or B (using pockets), that sail was much slower to rig with battens.

    Good luck!
    Arne

    PS:
    The brilliant thing with Amateur Method B of assembling the sail along the battens, is that one doesn’t have to roll up any sail at all and pass it under the sewing machine’s arm.
    On the last two sail I have made, the very last seam I did was to add the batten pocket for the middle batten position. Even removing and replacing a battenpocket can be done without problems.



    Last modified: 28 May 2019 15:09 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 27 May 2019 01:39
    Reply # 7442524 on 7439861
    Gary Pick wrote:

    First sail after fitting the batten pockets has been very positive. I had to adjust the position of the sling point forward a few inches to get rid of the diagonal creases. I engaged the outboard in a couple of tacks but that could have been due to light wind and tide effect, other than that Redwing performed very well. Looking forward to the next sail.


    Always a great moment when a project comes together and you get to try the results.  Looks good.
  • 27 May 2019 01:38
    Reply # 7442454 on 644008
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    I've been following your progress. Well done, your cambered sail looks very nice.

  • 26 May 2019 23:00
    Reply # 7439861 on 644008

    First sail after fitting the batten pockets has been very positive. I had to adjust the position of the sling point forward a few inches to get rid of the diagonal creases. I engaged the outboard in a couple of tacks but that could have been due to light wind and tide effect, other than that Redwing performed very well. Looking forward to the next sail.


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    Last modified: 26 May 2019 23:09 | Anonymous member
  • 14 Apr 2019 12:13
    Reply # 7281468 on 644008

    The sail is finally back on Redwing and after much head scratching over how I had set up the LHP I finally got it sorted...at least enough to test sail it. I still have to fit the mast parrels and I can drop the mooring lines. The pockets look good but one had a very tight section I had to cut. I guess I wandering a bit close with the stitching.


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  • 21 Mar 2019 02:35
    Reply # 7237320 on 644008

    After much struggle I've come to the conclusion V90 thread is a bit overkill for my poor Husqvarna. Anyway apart from the loops for the ties the sail cover is done. I bought a sewing awl a while back so maybe I'll use it to sew the loops for the ties on...a nice meditaion. :)

  • 20 Mar 2019 04:37
    Reply # 7235701 on 644008

    Working on the sail cover now and I have to say I’m getting a bit over sewing.

  • 17 Mar 2019 05:59
    Reply # 7228073 on 644008

    I used webbing batten parrels on Footprints with great success. I used 50mm wide webbing which was pulled quite tight. As of when I sold Footprints these parrels had done 7 years of service, many miles, coastal and ocean, and with no problems at all. I sewed loops in the ends of the webbing, one loop secured to the forward end of the batten, the other end of the webbing attached to the batten with a light lashing which passed around the batten and was prevented from moving forward with two plastic 'pegs' screwed to the batten wall. There is a photo on my profile photo album, new sail. It should be noted that Footprints had very long batten parrels to allow for moving the sail fore and aft on the mast.

    I should be able to copy that photo here? 

  • 16 Mar 2019 23:13
    Reply # 7227836 on 7227295
    Anonymous wrote:

    Graham,

    How does that work, tying the seatbelt webbing with a constrictor knot? The knot is in the webbing itself? Or is a piece of somewhat light line tied in a constrictor knot to lash the webbing to the batten?

    On AUKLET, batten parrels are 1/4 inch braided line with spiral plastic electrical wrap  around it – the loose stuff that is worked around the line and then slides freely. I'm not sure how much difference it makes, but it has not been a problem. The line is tied to the battens using double constrictor knots – a variation on a regular constrictor. Gorilla tape is wrapped two layers thick around the batten itself, and has been working well as a stop.

    Shemaya


    Hi Shemaya,  I have just tied the constrictor knot in the webbing itself.  Because the 50mm webbing gives significant surface contact with the alloy batten, it seems to be ok, though it is also tied just behind the fendering.  A double constrictor knot would have to be even better.  I did not want to drill holes in the alloy battens.  Though they don't flex much, I was worried about weakening the batten.  Alloy is notorious for cracking around holes if it has any flex in it, hence the advice not to put holes above the partners in an alloy mast.
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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