Good sailcloth for JR

  • 16 Feb 2016 20:44
    Reply # 3825924 on 1206989
    Deleted user

    A possible factor in cloth degradation is oxidisation. Polyesters usually have a small portion of oxygen-susceptible products (diethylene glycol) in their makeup as an unwanted byproduct of their manufacture. This can cause a polyester-based cloth to break down over time. It may not be widely known but one of the functions of the resin in Dacron is to retard this oxidation process.

    Perhaps - just speculation - cloths which have a coating on one side are more susceptible to oxidation, which would leave their fibres more vulnerable to mechanical wearing and thinning from tension. All things being equal, I'd be inclined to choose a cloth that's coated on both sides...

  • 16 Feb 2016 05:00
    Reply # 3824340 on 3824074
    Alan B Martienssen wrote:

    Has anyone sourced fabric from China? It's not that easy getting fabric shipped from USA. I just wondered if anyone has researched Chinese sources, especially as many of the fabrics were made there in the first place.


    It would be worth looking into because it is possible to source products very inexpensively from China. A good example is my previous wind generator, a Chinese copy of a Rutland which I landed in NZ for just over NZ$300. It worked just fine for the couple of years I had it, put out as much power as my current genuine Rutland, (which cost over $2000), but just made a bit more noise. The reason I no longer have the Chinese generator is not the fault of the generator itself. Also my Chinese made inflatable dinghy has now done six years and seems to be lasting well.

    You could search for 'Made in China' - sailcloth. Or other fabric.

    Last modified: 16 Feb 2016 05:01 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Feb 2016 00:48
    Reply # 3824074 on 1206989

    Has anyone sourced fabric from China? It's not that easy getting fabric shipped from USA. I just wondered if anyone has researched Chinese sources, especially as many of the fabrics were made there in the first place.

  • 15 Jul 2015 03:22
    Reply # 3434233 on 1206989
    Yes, you pays your money and you makes your choice.  Considerations that ought to be taken into account also include:
    • how much UV will your sails be subject to
    • will you use a sail cover
    • will you be crossing oceans or just pottering around locally

    It's good for you to be sharing your research.  There seems to be surprisingly little choice in the way of fabrics, or maybe only a few members have done the research and/or have access only to USAnian fabrics.  Apparently there are one or two other companies that make Sunbrella-style acrylic, but none of it appears to be available in NZ.


  • 12 Jul 2015 17:57
    Reply # 3431037 on 1206989

    Hey all:  A junkrig armchair sailor here, but have been researching fabric choices as we slowly plan the conversion of our Freedom 40.  

    Marlen - the maker of Top Gun, Top Gun 9 (formerly Mustang), and Odyssey (formerly Odyssey III) put out a nice table with performance properties of their fabrics - http://www.marlentextiles.com/odyssey-specs.html.  The other fabric we are considering is Surlast, made by Glen Raven, who also make Sunbrella.  I've not found 

    SURLAST Technical Data

    • Content: 100% Solution Dyed PolyesterWeight: 7 ounces/square yard?Width: 60 inches
    • Hydrostatic Test: 90 cm
    • Spray (Large): 100 Front / 100 Back
    • Break Strength: Warp 325 lbs. / Fill 275 lbs.
    • Tear Strength: Warp 40 lbs. / Fill 35 lbs.
    • Abrasion Resistance:50,000 cycles Wyzenbeek Test
    • Back Coating: Urethane coating
    Somewhere I came across some test data of polyester fabric properties after some exposure/use and they dropped quite a bit.  If I find it again I

    Regarding acrylic fabrics - Sunbrella has a abrasion or  Wyzenbeek Test score of around 15,000.  
  • 10 May 2015 21:47
    Reply # 3338392 on 1206989

    I suspect that the Sunbrella furniture grade would be too loosely woven (to make it soft  and comfortable) to be suitable for use as sailcloth. I'd want to take the high abrasion resistance with a pinch of salt. High abrasion resistance when used on furniture is one thing; high abrasion resistance when trapped between two battens that are moving relative to each other, or a batten and the mast, is another. I know you could have zigzags, stripes, tweed-look, floral patterns etc, but...

    I think the choice comes down to Top Gun 9/Mustang, Surlast and Odyssey, in approximately that order. They are all about half the price of the Sunbrella, and with better lasting qualities.

  • 08 May 2015 03:40
    Reply # 3336112 on 1206989
    I've just been investigating the Sail Rite site re fabrics.  Interestingly, the furnishing grade of Sunbrella seems to perform in a very comparable fashion to Odyssey III, in addition to having a wider selection of colours!  Admittedly, its breathability might count against it.  On the other hand, its Abrasion Resistance is better.  Its weight is similar. (Not shown in the following table)

    Views?


    Fabric Selection Breathe ability Water proof Abrasion Resistance UV Resistance Colour fastness Clean ability
    Sunbrella Furniture Fabric 5 1 4 3 5 5
    Sunbrella Marine Grade 4 3 2 5 5 5
    Sunbrella Plus 3 4 3 5 5 4
    Sunbrella Supreme 2 4 3 5 5 4
    SeaMark 1 5 4 5 5 4
    Surlast 4 3 5 3 5 4
    Top Gun 2 4 5 3 2 3
    Odyssey III 3 3 4 3 2 3
    Stamoid Vinyl 1 5 4 4 4 3-5
    Shelter-Rite Vinyl 1 5 5 3 4 5
    Cotton Duck (Marine-treated, preshrunk) 5 4 4 1 N/A 4

  • 10 Apr 2014 22:32
    Reply # 1535532 on 1535009
    Ben Bruce wrote:Can someone comment on the weight of material that is needed?

    It is logical in my mind that the lower panels could be constructed of lighter material and then get heavier as  you move up the sail to correspond with wind force as the sail is reefed. It appears most sails are made with the same weight throughout. Any thoughts on this?
    Hi Ben

    David has replied, in our other thread, to your first point.
     
    Re your second, you could certainly do that, but I don't know of anyone that has. More usual is to use heavier cloth in the top two panel, as these are effectively your storm gear. I wouldn't see the point in varying cloth weight right through the sail. Remember that battens may break leading you to reef out a panel by lashing battens together. Since you can't predict which batten may break, you might need heavier cloth where you never imagined.
    Last modified: 10 Apr 2014 22:33 | Anonymous member
  • 10 Apr 2014 02:45
    Reply # 1535009 on 1206989
    Deleted user
    I have seen the military spec nylon on rolls with number ratings like 420D. Do you know the  weight or number of the blue nylon cloth mentioned in your posts? I also have seen Dacron sail cloth on ebay for around 4 dollars a yard for 5.5oz. With Dacron sailcloth available at that economical price why wouldn't I use Dacron? Maybe the quality of this material is suspect from ebay. Can someone comment on the weight of material that is needed?

    It is logical in my mind that the lower panels could be constructed of lighter material and then get heavier as  you move up the sail to correspond with wind force as the sail is reefed. It appears most sails are made with the same weight throughout. Any thoughts on this?


    Thank you everyone!
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
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