A SibLing with coachroof and keel, no bilgeboards

  • 20 Mar 2021 18:03
    Reply # 10218087 on 10215584
    Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Paul wrote:

    ...off topic but,

    there’s a new fix for us junkies on Annie’s 

    blog..



    Thanks for the tip, Paul, that was great reading. To better follow Annie's movements up along  the coast, I opened Google Map in another window. Recommended.

    Arne
  • 19 Mar 2021 23:07
    Reply # 10215584 on 10182961

    ...off topic but,

    there’s a new fix for us junkies on Annie’s 

    blog..



  • 17 Mar 2021 07:58
    Reply # 10205599 on 10205048
    Annie wrote:
    Scott wrote:

    I like FanShi's companionway. 

    I like the companionway, too, and with an extra foot of height, there should be no difficulty getting in and out.  The folded perspex not only makes a good table, but an excellent wind-proof, water resistant spot for chart or cruising guide and a safe place for spectacles and binoculars.  The upper surface provides a nice, horizontal shelf for drinks or snacks.  And when closed, it doesn't block out the light, making everything gloomy.  Wind and rain can come from astern, as well as from ahead!

    Actually, at NZD52,000 in the water, I'm not sure how much money you are going to be able to save.  This is the cost of the materials, consumables hardware and keel.  It doesn't include rent or tools.

    It's true that with a bifold washboard (of which only the upper part really needs to be clear, for light and a view astern), I could get a companionway vertical height of up to 120 cm without eating into the deck; but then a clear dome and/or pramhood would have to be added for sheltered watchkeeping, which adds back in some complexity and expense. KISS. With the arrangement I've drawn, the headroom is more like 125cm, and I wouldn't want less than that if I were 6ft/183cm tall. Anyway, "different folks, different strokes", as somebody once said.

    The second point is certainly valid. There are two reasons to build this boat, I think: 1) to take on the challenge of creating something satisfying and beautiful out of a pile of raw materials, and 2) because only this boat, and no other, will tick all the items on one's wishlist. If one simply requires a good JR boat, without getting too fussy about the details, then it's always going to cost less to convert and renovate an old production GRP boat than to build from scratch.

  • 17 Mar 2021 03:14
    Reply # 10205048 on 10183862
    Scott wrote:

    I like FanShi's companionway. 

    Ii like the companionway, too, and with an extra foot of height, there should be no difficulty getting in and out.  The folded perspex not only makes a good table, but an excellent wind-proof, water resistant spot for chart or cruising guide and a safe place for gspectacles and binoculars.  The upper surface provides a nice, horizontal shelf for drinks or snacks.  And when closed, it doesn't block out the light, making everything gloomy.  Wind and rain can come from astern, as well as from ahead!

    Actually, at NZD52,000 in the water, I'm not sure how much money you are going to be able to save.  This is the cost of the materials, consumables hardware and keel.  It doesn't include rent or tools.

    Last modified: 17 Mar 2021 03:23 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Mar 2021 23:15
    Reply # 10204561 on 10202539
    Arne wrote:

    In Scandinavia, in particular in Sweden, many cruising sailboats have been built with a permanent glass windscreen. A couple of years ago I crewed in one of these (Najad 330) around the coast, and I found that windscreen to be A GREAT THING. Every yacht should have one. This Najad had just a folding sprayhood on top of it. However, since the view around was just as good with the sprayhood raised as with it lowered, I think a hard-top would be better, being stronger and with room for fitting solar panels. Attached, you will find a fast sketch with this hardtop windscreen (doghouse?), with an optional sprayhood added to it.

    It came out a bit tall, but it should show the idea. This setup should give a good combination of coastal cruising in the cockpit, and occasional deep water passages.

    Arne


    On Arion I always had a solid cockpit roof, but in 2015 I replaced the soft dodger with a solid perspex one and loved it.  I could stand in the companionway as we sailed along, warm and dry, with a perfect view of the rig and ocean.  Click on photo for larger image


    Last modified: 16 Mar 2021 23:17 | Anonymous member
  • 16 Mar 2021 11:26
    Reply # 10202544 on 10182961

    And Arne. Got hat too. Thanks 

  • 16 Mar 2021 11:24
    Reply # 10202541 on 10182961

    Ok. Got that. Thanks for the extra info David. 

  • 16 Mar 2021 11:23
    Reply # 10202539 on 10182961
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    In Scandinavia, in particular in Sweden, many cruising sailboats have been built with a permanent glass windscreen. A couple of years ago I crewed in one of these (Najad 330) around the coast, and I found that windscreen to be A GREAT THING. Every yacht should have one. This Najad had just a folding sprayhood on top of it. However, since the view around was just as good with the sprayhood raised as with it lowered, I think a hard-top would be better, being stronger and with room for fitting solar panels. Attached, you will find a fast sketch with this hardtop windscreen (doghouse?), with an optional sprayhood added to it.

    It came out a bit tall, but it should show the idea. This setup should give a good combination of coastal cruising in the cockpit, and occasional deep water passages.

    Arne


  • 15 Mar 2021 17:07
    Reply # 10199314 on 10182961

    Hello Frederik,

    The companionway is similar to the one I had on my Sadler 25, ~1977-1989. The aim there was to get more headroom in a small boat, as well as providing a sheltered watchkeeping position. It worked well for coastal cruising.

    I hope you can see on image 4 that there is an outwards facing lip on the sloping surface and on the after face of the bulkhead, that together form a drainage channel on each side. The sloping forward face and triangular sides of the part above deck level would be of framed glass or acrylic. 

    For this SibLing, I would make a single plywood washboard that is hinged on its lower edge and has framing on its sides and lower edge to overlap the lip. It would have non-slip on its inner face, as it's to be walked on. I would make the sloping hatch from a sheet of smoked acrylic, hinged on its top edge and with framing on its sides and top edge to overlap the lip. There might be a foam rubber seal around these edges, but I don't think that's essential. The lower edge of the hatch should overlap the washboard by enough to allow drips of water to run off outside, but there need not be a watertight seal here. In fact a small gap is useful for ventilation, so long as it only passes air, not water. There might be a piece of framing on the lower edge that extends upwards so as to cause water to run off at the corners, into the drainage channels.

    For a boat to go to the Southern Ocean, or to emulate Mingming's exploits, there would be no washboard, the bulkhead would extend over this area, and a Lewmar 70 hatch, or similar, would be mounted on the sloping face. But I would find that very inconvenient for less demanding cruising and living aboard. My view is that a companionway only needs to be watertight when a full rollover is a real possibility; a knockdown that puts the mast just below horizontal doesn't result in serious flooding, just some inconvenient splashes (how do I know? ;-) )

    Last modified: 16 Mar 2021 08:10 | Anonymous member
  • 15 Mar 2021 10:00
    Reply # 10198045 on 10182961

    Hi David. 

    I like that companionway design. Maybe something I can use on my build.

    Kind of sloped Dutch double door. 

    Want elaborate on that idea?

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    Last modified: 15 Mar 2021 10:02 | Anonymous member
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