HFJY34

  • 24 Apr 2022 04:43
    Reply # 12736991 on 7155071

    Spring is here. Deck construction screwed, glued and bevelled. Took a while..


    3 files
    Last modified: 24 Apr 2022 04:45 | Anonymous member
  • 09 Feb 2022 07:34
    Reply # 12585979 on 7155071

    Ja Rudolf. To cold for glue, but  Long John is helpful whilst dryfitting all the bits and pieces.

    Should be done with all that when temperatures are getting there.  

  • 08 Feb 2022 20:50
    Reply # 12585030 on 7155071

    Good work Frederik, nice to see your progress.

    Not too cold for gluing etc?

    Regards Rudolf

  • 06 Feb 2022 13:27
    Reply # 12578752 on 7155071

    Some progress on the 34

    Deck beam construction is now dry fitted in place. Waiting for higher temperatures before glueing & screwing. 

    Still lots of interior stuff to fit before putting the ply/lycell 100 (Dyvinicell equivalent) deck on. 

    5 files
    Last modified: 06 Feb 2022 13:34 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Dec 2021 18:22
    Reply # 12201433 on 12200425
    Anonymous wrote:

    Frederik it is interesting how Paul has led the tail end of the single sheet back to the leech end of the bottom boom batten then forward, then down to the deck and then only back to the aft end of the coach house.

    I think I know his reasoning but perhaps you or Paul may care to elaborate?

    Nothing new or original with leading the sheet back to the hatchway in this manner. I had it on LC and Annie and Pete had it on Badger, Annie also had it on Fantail and now on Fanshi.  

    If you don't lead all your lines back to the hatch/pramhood you are missing out on a key feature of the junk rig. Namely the ability to control the sail without having to go on deck.

    To get the full benefits of a junk, you need to understand that there are three components that make up the whole package. Namely the junk rig, the Hasler pramhood in its circular hatch and the selfsteering windvane that can be operated from the hatch. On a modern boat I'd add a good autopilot that also must be operatable from the hatch.

    The 3(4) together make for a boat that is easy and safe to operate at sea, and setup correctly, you almost never have to go on deck.

    Last modified: 18 Dec 2021 18:26 | Anonymous member
  • 18 Dec 2021 08:17
    Reply # 12200425 on 7155071

    Frederik it is interesting how Paul has led the tail end of the single sheet back to the leech end of the bottom boom batten then forward, then down to the deck and then only back to the aft end of the coach house.

    I think I know his reasoning but perhaps you or Paul may care to elaborate?

    1 file
    Last modified: 18 Dec 2021 08:19 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Dec 2021 15:03
    Reply # 12198796 on 7155071

    Thompson rig for HF34


    Paul Thompson has drawn up a new sail plan for the HF 34, based on la Chica’s foresail.

    The mast is now further aft, out of the bunk and the interior layout up forward suits me better.

    The CE stays the same, which is important to me as I want to keep the mizzen.   

    I’ve discussed Paul’s design with Chris Morejohn and he thinks it’s good.  

    So do I. 

    Feel free to comment. 

    3 files
    Last modified: 17 Dec 2021 15:08 | Anonymous member
  • 17 Nov 2021 15:52
    Reply # 12133333 on 7155071
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Sloop and Yawl

    It is not easy to decide on the right position of the (geometrical) CE in relation to CLR (‘CLP’), in particular not on a vessel that I am not familiar with.

    Position of the main mast.
    The original mast has 20% of its waterline in front of that mast. Frederik is considering moving the mast aft to the 25% position (the yellow one). I have my doubts about the need for that. My own Ingeborg has only 15% waterline forward of the mast, and the successful Cornish Pilot 30, Annie, got rigged with the solid wooden mast sitting only 12.7% aft of the bow.

    Anyway, I remodelled the top section on my AR=2.05 master sail and scaled it up until the battens became 5.90m. This was hung on both the ‘new’ yellow mast (25% position) and later on the original mast and position.

    In the first case, the CE ended far enough aft to probably work well enough as a sloop rig, without that mizzen.
    In the second case, I hope the mainsail will result in a bit lee helm, which the mizzen is meant to balance out. Note how far the CE moves aft with the mizzen kicking in. The mainsail could probably be moved a bit further forward, partly by making the mast plumb, and partly by shifting the halyard’s slingpoint aft to 10% behind the middle of the yard.

    The mizzen.
    Frankly, I think the shown version would be awkward to operate with those battens. I think that a simple triangular mizzen with a sprit boom, cut perfectly flat from strong canvas, would be easier to furl along the mast. I doubt if it needs to be bigger than 5-6 sqm.

    Such a mizzen should ensure easy steering  -  and even self-steer the boat  -  much of the time.

    Arne


  • 16 Nov 2021 12:40
    Reply # 12130802 on 7155071

    Back to rig thinking..

    There is maybe another option, without the split rig. 

    As drawn the sail has ca. 15% balance with the 70 degree yard angle and a lead CLR-CE of 15% ( that’s where the mizzen comes in the picture..)

    Now.. if we decrease the lead to 10% and increase the balance to 20 % with a yard angle of say, 65 degrees, then the mast can move aft by ca. 90 cm, just aft of bulkhead 8, putting the bunk forward of that. 

    With plenty of drift between slingpoint and masthead there will be room to fiddle. 

    We keep the mizzen.

    I’ve discussed this option now with Chris Morejohn and he likes the idea. 

    Feel free to come with input. 

    1 file
    Last modified: 16 Nov 2021 15:05 | Anonymous member
  • 14 Nov 2021 15:59
    Reply # 12126229 on 7155071

    Over she goes..

    2410 kg on the hook. 

    5 files
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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