HFJY34

  • 14 Nov 2021 13:21
    Reply # 12126100 on 12124600

    Last pics upside down.


    Thank you for sharing all the build photos. The boat looks great! 

    Last modified: 14 Nov 2021 13:22 | Anonymous member
  • 13 Nov 2021 20:50
    Reply # 12125003 on 12124600
    Frederik wrote:

    Last pics upside down.


    Looking forward to seeing the pics of the boat right side up. It will be exciting to see the proper shape of the boat, especially as it seems you already have some of the cabin structure built. I like the streamlined shape of the design, as with the smaller 28.
  • 13 Nov 2021 16:56
    Reply # 12124600 on 7155071

    Last pics upside down.


    3 files
  • 09 Nov 2021 06:31
    Reply # 12112185 on 7155071

    Tanks for that Arne. 

    That sounds like a feasible option. 

    I’ll talk to Chris about the implications of moving the mast position aft and get back to you. 


  • 08 Nov 2021 21:44
    Reply # 12111242 on 7155071
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    65°yard, 60% slingpoint, 24% balance.

    After having sailed quite a bit in my Ingeborg with the two halyard blocks on her yard 5 and 9% aft of the middle, I am pretty convinced that it would work even with the forward slingpoint block positioned 10% aft of the middle (60% position).

    Now I made a try with a 65° yard and the slingpoint this far aft. I found that I could move the sail to about 24% mast balance (143cm from luff along the 5.90m battens). 

    I would not recommend more mast balance without testing it in smaller scale. After all, the mast will dig in quite a bit in the cambered panels at this point.

    In other words, I think it should be easy enough to produce a sail with between 15 and 24% mast balance.
    Just tell me what you need.

    Arne

    Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 09:45 | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • 08 Nov 2021 18:24
    Reply # 12110660 on 7155071

     A SJ or not is a discussion in itself.

     But getting the mast out of the bow is always a good thing i.m.o.

    I also like the yawl as it can keep you facing the wind at all times. 

  • 08 Nov 2021 17:20
    Reply # 12110465 on 7155071

    There is maybe another option, without the split rig. 

    As drawn the sail has ca. 15% balance with the 70 degree yard angle and a lead CLR-CE of 15% ( that’s where the mizzen comes in the picture..)
    Now.. if we decrease the lead to 10% and increase the balance to 20 % with a yard angle of say, 65 degrees, then the mast can move aft by ca. 90 cm, just aft of bulkhead 8, putting the bunk forward of that. 

    With plenty of drift between slingpoint and masthead there will be room to fiddle. 


    1 file
  • 06 Nov 2021 18:45
    Reply # 12105558 on 7155071

    David Tyler’s  SibLim 10 post with the SJR got me thinking.

    30-35% sail balance would possibly allow me to move the mast further aft and place the double berth forward of the mast.

    less weight forward, lower yard angle, more balance, lower center of effort, maybe no need for the mizzen although I do like the idea of having one..

    Hmmm....

    Still waiting for the crane..

    3 files
    Last modified: 06 Nov 2021 18:47 | Anonymous member
  • 01 Nov 2021 21:23
    Reply # 12090482 on 7155071

    Plan B is probably a bit less nerve-racking than Plan A, too.

    I was so excited to see SibLim when the hull was turned over.  It is really worth getting her outside just for that!!

    1 file
  • 01 Nov 2021 20:38
    Reply # 12090321 on 7155071

    Jeps Annie. Very happy. 

    Plan A of turning her around hanging from the beams in the shed is not happening due to lack of space, so plan B is set in motion. I’ll take the shed down, turnover with the professionals and put the shed back in place. 

    The good part is that I get to see my work from a distance. 

    Soon. 

       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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